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December 3, 2016

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists Update - December 3rd

The Largehearted Boy List of Online 'Best of 2016' Book Lists

For the ninth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find. As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating daily.

The Master List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online year-end book list I have missed.

Other daily updates to the 2016 master list.

Revisit previous years' collections of year-end book lists: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade).


Today's additions to the Online Year-end "Best of 2015" Book Lists:

The Age (Australian authors' favourite books)
Bioteaching (top ecology books)
Bioteaching (top geology books)
Britfic (favourite books)
BuzzFeed (hottest romance books)
Caroline County Public Library (favorite books)
CKNY (best cookbooks)
Daily Missoulian (best books)
Ear Chic Chicago (best healthy cookbooks)
Financial Times (best book lists)
Food & Wine (best cookbooks)
Globe and Mail (best books)
Guardian (best books on drink)
Guardian (best books on food)
Guardian (best children's books)
Guardian (best nature books)
Irish Times (favourite books)
JP O'Malley (favorite books)
Michael Matuzak (favorite books)
Mother Jones (notable books)
NetGalley UK (books of the year)
Our Daily Read (best children's books)
Publishers Weekly (authors' favorite books)
R & R…Readers and Reference (favourite books)
Smithsonian (best "art meets science" books)
Washington Post (most ambitious, irritating, hopeful and overrated books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily updates to the master list

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)





December 2, 2016

Book Notes - Meredith Alling "Sing the Song"

Sing the Song

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Meredith Alling's short story collection Sing the Song is powerful and unsettling.

Vol. 1 Brooklyn wrote of the book:

"Alling has managed to write a collection that succeeds to, as Alan Partiridge might say, 'Straight away, you’ve got them by the jaffers.' Whether you've got jaffers or not, these stories will undoubtedly grab you."


In her own words, here is Meredith Alling's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection Sing the Song:



I can't listen to anything while I'm writing. A friend recently told me that they listen to podcasts while writing. Podcasts! I can't even listen to an instrumental. I need total silence; it's not ideal. This means that for the most part, I write at home, usually in my bed, with only the occasional airplane or helicopter noise in the background, or a dog barking, or—worst case—a leaf-blower. Sometimes I also listen to my neighbor calling his cats in.

So what I've made is a playlist of songs that I love and relate to my book on a mood level.

Mazzy Star - "She's My Baby"

Sometimes when I'm stressed out, I look up old videos of Mazzy Star performing. Hope Sandoval is sweet-looking—textbook waif—with a wavy, astral voice. I thought of her—and this song—when I was writing the story Rita. "She's my baby, ain't that something?"

Failure - "The Nurse Who Loved Me"

I was big into Failure in college. I'm not going to make a joke here. This song has always sounded to me like a record played on the wrong speed; it's bendy and strong. "She's got everything I need: pharmacy keys."

Superdrag - "Annetichrist"

When I was 15, I became friends with an older guy in a Michigan rock band. I used to go to punk shows at The Shelter and St. Andrews and The Magic Stick, and sometimes I'd see his band play. I don't remember how much older he was than me, but I think four or five years. He made me a mixtape that introduced me to bands I still love, like Ida and Jets to Brazil, and later, he made me a tape with Slint on one side and Superdrag on the other. He gave it to me when he picked me up in his van one night to go to Big Boy. I remember looking at his powder blue turtleneck while he ate spaghetti. "Crazy how when I get shattered, nothing's cool, nothing matters."

Warpaint - "Disco//very"

Warpaint is an all-women rock band and very, very cool. I love this song and dancing in slow motion to it. "Don't you battle, we'll kill you."

Morrissey - "He Knows I'd Love to See Him"

When I was 22, I was really close to getting a tattoo that said "Patrick Michael" above my heart. What of it. "He knows, he knows, or I think he does."

The Beach Boys - "Don't Talk (Put Your Head On My Shoulder)"

I read that Brian Wilson said this is one of the sweetest songs he ever sang, childlike and innocent. It's definitely sweet, but it's also a dirge. "Come close, close your eyes and be still."

Cap'n Jazz - "In The Clear"

I had to make a pinewood derby car for science class in tenth grade, and I painted it red and wrote a lyric from this song on the side: "ABCDEFGHIJKLOST." I won (I didn't).

Todd Terje feat. Bryan Ferry - "Johnny and Mary"

A yoga instructor played this song during savasana about six months ago (savasana is when you lie flat at the end of class like you're dead and just completely chill), and I couldn't focus on relaxing because I was straining to hear the lyrics so I could look it up after. It's a cover of a song by Robert Palmer, and it sounds like Twins Peaks x David Bowie. "Mary says he's lacking a real sense of proportion."

Drake - "Too Much"

I'm legally obligated, as a member of year-strong Drake-related text group and an all-around fan and defender, to include a song by the kid, Champagne Papi, the 6 God. It's fun to hate Drake; I understand. He was on the TV! And his voice is funny! And he tells women not to talk to other men, and that their boyfriends aren't cool, and that he made them, but here's the thing: when I listen to Drake, I feel pure, clean, effortless happiness. I'll take it. "Done saying I'm done playing."


Meredith Alling and Sing the Song links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book
excerpts from the book
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Vol. 1 Brooklyn review

The Nervous Breakdown interview with the author
Otherppl interview with the author
Vol. 1 Brooklyn interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists Update - December 2nd

The Largehearted Boy List of Online 'Best of 2016' Book Lists

For the ninth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find. As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating daily.

The Master List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online year-end book list I have missed.

Other daily updates to the 2016 master list.

Revisit previous years' collections of year-end book lists: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade).


Today's additions to the Online Year-end "Best of 2015" Book Lists:

Alohamora Open a Book (best children's book)
Barnes and Noble (best young adult books)
Big Comic Page (best comics)
Bioteaching (top evolution books)
Boswell Bookstore (top books)
Cosmos (top illustrated science books)
Entropy (best nonfiction books)
Financial Times (books)
GAlexandra (best cookbooks for millenials)
Guardian (best gardening books)
Guardian (best music books)
Guardian (best sports books)
Guardian (best stocking stuffer books)
Guardian (favourite cookbooks)
Huffington Post (best film books)
Justagirlwithabookdream (favourite books)
Kottke (best books)
Library Journal (best genre fiction)
Library Journal (best graphic novels)
Library Journal (best nonfiction)
Library Journal (best poetry books)
Library Journal (top books)
Live Food Laugh Food (favorite books)
London Evening Standard (funniest books)
Marginal Revolution (best fiction)
MIchael Magras (favorite books)
Mother Jones (favorite books)
New York Public Library (best books for kids and teens)
Readings (best crossover YA books)
Science Friday (best science books)
Smithsonian (bets books about food)
Suffolk Libraries (best books)
Today's Parent (best kids' books)
Vogue (best books)
Well Plated (best cookbooks)
The What (top fiction books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily updates to the master list

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Atomic Books Comics Preview - December 2, 2016

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


A.D. After Death Book 01

A.D. After Death Book 01
by Scott Snyder / Jeff Lemire

A.D. is what happens when two of comics' best writers team up on a book. Snyder's writing mixed with Lemire's art creates a fascinating and complex story about a time after we cure death. Generally, I'm not a fan of mixing prose in with comics (hey, if I wanted to read prose, I'd read a novel!), A.D. is the rare example where it works beautifully - due in no small part to Snyder's excellent writing and Lemire's compelling art. This book (part one of a three part series) is a must-read book of the year.


Black Hood: An Anthology of Depression and Anxiety

Black Hood: An Anthology of Depression and Anxiety
edited by Josh Bayer

This killer anthology comic explores aspects of depression and anxiety - something not uncommon in the comics community (or the general population this time of year). It features heartfelt and sincere work by John Porcellino, Box Brown, Tara Booth, Noah Van Sciver, Elizabeth Bethea, Josh Simmons, Mike Freiheit, Pat Aulisio, Heleigh Buck, and many more.


Life And Legend Of Wallace Wood Volume 1

Life And Legend Of Wallace Wood Volume 1
by Wallace Wood

When one says the words "greatest illustrators of all time" one of the first names that should automatically come to everyone's mind is Wally Wood: Commercial illustrator, EC comics cartoonist (who publisher Ernest Gaines described as EC's most troubled and also one of their best artists), one of MAD Magazine's original Usual Gang of Idiots. This gorgeous, large hardcover lavishly illustrated with Wood's work and personal photos looks at the life of an American treasure.


Math Magazine #3

Math Magazine #3
by MacKenzie

This new journal presents smut for the high-minded. Finding inspiration from everything from vintage erotica to Instagram feeds and cam websites - Math offers well-photographed porn and well-considered erotica.


Paper Girls Volume 2

Paper Girls Volume 2
by Brian K Vaughan / Cliff Chiang

Okay, everyone. The new Paper Girls collection is out. I feel like this should be some kind of holiday. In this volume, there is a dramatic shift the story.


Slow Reader Magazine Volume 1

Slow Reader Magazine Volume 1
by Sumanth Prabhaker

The first issue of this excellent lit journal focuses on the influence of fiction master Haruki Murakami. It features contributions from Jesse Ball, Jeffrey Brown, Raymond Carver, Tess Gallagher, Daniel Handler, Etgar Keret, Chris Ware, and many more.


Turn Loose Our Death Rays And Kill Them All!: The Complete Works Of Fletcher Hanks

Turn Loose Our Death Rays And Kill Them All!: The Complete Works Of Fletcher Hanks
by Fletcher Hanks

It was the previous two collections of Hanks work that helped establish the genre of outsider superhero comics artist. Fantagraphics here generously collects those two now hard to find volumes into one fantastic, large hardcover.


Wuvable Oaf: Blood And Metal

Wuvable Oaf: Blood And Metal
by Ed Luce

Ed Luce's lovable, wuvable Oaf looks for love in the metal and wrestling scenes of San Francisco. This is just the comic for fans of metal, bears, cats, and, well, comics.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2015" Book Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (December's Best New Books, A New Holiday Song from Low, and more)

Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Vulture, and Signature previewed December's best new books.


Stream a new Low holiday song.


39 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Saturday (bringing the total number to 376), including The New York Times' best books, the Minneapolis Star/Tribune's best books, and Chicago Tribune's best cookbooks.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Beer Money by Frances Stroh
Edward Unspooled by Craig Lancaster
Galapagos by Kurt Vonnegut
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
I Served the King of England by Bohumil Hrabal
Memento Mori by Muriel Spark
Memoirs by Tennessee Williams
Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut
The Nasty Bits by Anthony Bourdain
Seiobo There Below by László Krasznahorkai
The Sky Over Lima by Juan Gómez Bárcena
Slapstick by Kurt Vonnegut
Sweet Caress by William Boyd
Timequake by Kurt Vonnegut
Undermajordomo Minor by Patrick deWitt
Us Conductors by Sean Michaels
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Welcome to the Monkeyhouse by Kurt Vonnegut

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Beasts and Children by Amy Parker
You Better Not Cry: Stories for Christmas by Augusten Burroughs


Stream a solo song from Peter Silberman of the Antlers.


Bustle previewed December's best new fiction and nonfiction books.


Stream a new song by Sia.


Stream a new version of Tracy Bonham's song "Brain Crack" that features Kathryn Calder.


The Times Literary Supplement recommended sixty works of fiction by women.


Decorate your Christmas tree with new wave ornaments.


The Rumpus interviewed author Vi Khi Nao.


Mexrissey, the Mexican Morrissey cover band, visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Literary Hub recommended great movies based on unusual literary material.


Stream a new Cayetana song.


Actress Anna Kendrick talked books and reading with the New York Times.


The Drive-By Truckers visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Flavorwire interviewed author Claire Beams.


The Guardian listed the best music books of 2016.


Broad City's Abbi Jacobson talked books and reading with Bustle.


LA Music Blog recommended holiday songs.


The finalist for the NBCC's 2016 John Leonard Prize (for first book in any genre) have been announced:

The Mothers, by Brit Bennett
The Girls, by Emma Cline
Here Comes the Sun, by Nicole Dennis-Benn
Homegoing, by Yaa Gyasi
The Nix, by Nathan Hill
Grief Is the Thing with Feathers, by Max Porter


Stream Melvins' cover of "Carol of the Bells."


Author Jonathan Lethem talked breakfast with Extra Crispy.


Stream a new Strand of Oaks song.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

December 1, 2016

Book Notes - Kevin Smokler "Brat Pack America"

Brat Pack America

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Kevin Smokler's riveting and well-researched Brat Pack America explores the enduring appeal of '80s films.


In his own words, here is Kevin Smokler's Book Notes music playlist for his book Brat Pack America:



Tell someone you’re working on a book about 80s teen movies and there’s even money they’ll will follow up with “You mean like The Breakfast Club?” At which point, there’s better than even money one of you will sing a refrain from Simple Minds’s “Don’t You Forget About Me,’ the movie’s theme and sonic stand in for writer/director John Hughes’s entire body of work and the generation who saw this 90-minute story of five high schoolers in Saturday detention as The Iceman Cometh of Reagan Era.

Which all makes sense and why wouldn’t you? I wrote a book about 80s teen movies because I have great love for these very movies and their place of honor in my own growing up. Prompt me and I’d break into a verse of “Don’t You Forget About Me” at a state funeral.

But in writing Brat Pack America I had something different in mind than a rapturous nostalgia trip. I wanted to look at not only what we already loved about The Breakfast Club and Heathers and House Party but also what we might have missed, their wonders that hid in plain sight, that testified even further to their greatness.

Soundtracks are rich pickings for those hidden gifts. So for my Book Notes playlist I made an 8–song EP from 80s teen movies you might not know even if you probably do know the movies they came from.


1. “We Are Not Alone” – Karla Devito. The Breakfast Club

The song underling the movie’s dance montage where each member of the soon-to-be-named Breakfast Club bear their souls via the boogie (remember Ally Sheedy’s all-limb shake that ends with a collapse on the floor?) New wave keyboard leads with a jagged female vocal resemble Kim Wilde wearing a torn army jacket. Lyrically, about not being afraid of intimacy, a more direct take on the message of the movie than “Don’t You Forget About Me, ” about the unknown of a new relationship aka what might happen when they all get back to school on Monday.

Trivia:

The “library” in The Breakfast Club was actually the school’s gymnasium. The actors changed clothes in nearby locker rooms.


2. “Miss Amanda Jones” – The March Violets. Some Kind of Wonderful

Unfairly minimized as “Pretty in Pink with the right ending”, Some Kind of Wonderful was a leap forward for John Hughes’s writing of female characters. The “Amanda Jones” in question parallels the Blaine character in Pink but here is a working class kid who knows her beauty has nabbed her a rich boyfriend and feels lousy about it. The sensitivity that Hughes writes and Leah Thompson plays this moral conflict turns a bouncy brit-pop cover of a classic rock hit (a favorite trick of Hughes’s. The original by the Rolling Stones shows up in the movie too) into a lot more than just a character’s theme song. Told in third person but sung collectively by women, it’s the sound representation of Amanda Jones understanding of herself as an object of desire and her agency in overcoming it.

Trivia:

John Hughes had a thing for the Rolling Stones and named the three principal characters in Some Kind of Wonderful—Keith, Watts, and Amanda Jones--after Rolling Stones band members and tunes.


3. “Invincible” – Pat Benatar. Legend of Billie Jean

The Legend of Billie Jean was a notorious flop in the summer of 1985 with blame often thrown at “Invincible”, a top ten hit the filmmakers had play about 85 times during the film. Since both soundtracks and a young MTV were becoming an important force in teen cinema, critics laughed off Billie Jean as a 100-minute music video trying and failing to be a movie too.

To borrow its most famous line, “Fair is Fair!” The dystopian tale of kids-running-from-the-law-across-a-heartless-desert-landscape, Billie Jean feels not like “Love is a Battlefield: The Movie” but a younger sibling to 70s cult classics like Vanishing Point and Two-Lane-Blacktop. And although “Invincible” is the most straightforward 80s pop number Pat Benatar ever did (I’ve got it on a weightlifting playlist next to “Eye of the Tiger.” It works), its erratic drum fills and melody that resembles night failing say “menace” and “unease” rather than raise your fist in salute. The Legend of Billie Jean, which (spoiler-not-spoiler) ends in disappointment and hard lessons not triumph, says that too.

Trivia:

Helen Slater and Christian Slater play brother and sister in this movie but are not actually related.


4. “Ain’t My Type of Hype,” Full Force. House Party

Actors on the soundtrack of their own movies are nothing special (see “She’s Like the Wind” sung by a Dirty Dancer named Swayze) unless those actors play the movie’s villains. Exhibit A-1: House Party, the zenith of the first generation of hip-hop movies, which began with 1983’s Wild Style. Starring Kid and Play as two high school best friends trying to throw a great party with the hip-hop/funk production team of Full Force playing the school bullies trying to spoil it.

Full Force’s “Ain’t My Type of Hype” is the last dance number on the soundtrack and the one that renders it impossible to sit still the rest of the movie. Backing vocals as percussion, a sample of Cheryl Lynn’s disco classic “Got to Be Real” inevitable instead of reheated, stabbing snare drums trading off with rhymes hopscotching on and off the beat. My hands are leaving the keyboard now to go blow something up.

Excuse me.

Trivia:

House Party is a movie that contains (almost) three sets of brothers. Written and directed by siblings Reginald and Warrington Hudlin, The trio of Full Force are real-life brothers too. And Kid and Play grew up together, are still best friends and talk as though they are blood.


5. “Fantastic Freaks at the Dixie” -- Fantastic Freaks, Wild Style

Nas called Wild Style “The Bible of Hip Hop” and opened his debut album Illmatic with a sample from the movie he named “Genesis.” The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has honored Wild Style as a pioneer of hip-hop cinema. Later generations of hip-hop artist have sampled from its soundtrack only a little less than from the discography of James Brown.

Consider “Fantastic Freaks at the Dixie”, a live track of five emcees rhyming almost completely in unison (which you almost never here anymore) over the baseline of laid down by DJing forefather Grand Wizard Theodore. Vocally dense, beat sparse, “Fantastic Freaks” has been sampled in over 170 songs. You’ll recognize the opening shouts of “C’mon! Louder!” from the chorus of Public Enemy’s “Louder Than a Bomb.“

Trivia: “The Dixie” in question was a large club on Freeman St in the South Bronx where future Rock n Roll Hall of Famer Grandmaster Flash threw parties.


6. “When the Shit Hits the Fan” – Circle Jerks, Suburbia

The tight knot of LA Punk movies—Repo Man, Suburbia and the first Decline of Western Civilization documentary—get too little credit as “80s teen movies” but are as vivid a portrait of youth culture in the city of Police Chief Daryl Gates and the 1984 Olympics as The Karate Kid or Valley Girl. And this less-than-two-minutes of fury at recession and economic discrimination nails it. Like with a nail gun to the forehead. Pay extra close attention to the opening and closing 5 seconds of this brief, sparse track, which begins with drums that sound like an army landing at Normandy and concludes with a sneaky surf bass resembling a footnote. Or a wink.

Trivia:

Suburbia contained only two professional actors. The rest were kids already in the community including a young Mike Balzary, aka Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers.


7. “Let’s Have a Party” – Wanda Jackson. Dead Poets Society

I’m not even sure Dead Poets Society had an official soundtrack as 90% of its music is instrumental score. But its few uses of song act as the more obvious reminders that Dead Poets, like many 80s teen movies, took place in the pre-Beatles late 50s-early 60s—Stand By Me, Dirty Dancing, Back to the Future, Peggy Sue Got Married.

“We’re Gonna Have a Party” was a 1960 hit by “First Lady of Roackabilly” Wanda Jackson and shows up in the movie when two of the dead poets build a transistor radio to tune in pop songs from the wider world that aren’t allowed in over the forbidding walls of Welton Academy boys school.

It’s not a stretch to see Robin William’s encouragement of the Dead Poets to “seize the day. Make your lives extraordinary” as a metaphor the coming of the 1960s. The use of the Wanda Jackson song, with a swagger burned by cigarettes clearly influenced Emmylou Harris influenced Janis Joplin and shows that the 60s was already here.

Trivia:

At one time, Bill Murray was considered for role of teacher John Keating that ultimately went to Robin Williams.


8. “Cry to Me” Solomon Burke. Dirty Dancing

The song playing when Baby Houseman propositions Johnny Castle with “Dance with Me?” Somehow tender and achingly sexy at once or maybe that’s just soul music at its finest. I only got to know Solomon Burke very recently via the closing scenes of season 3 of The Wire and therefore hear him as the voice of sadness and human reckoning. Here he feels like the sweat above your eyes, the heat rolling off the shoulders of a summer night and the desire hanging in the room as Baby and Johnny circle each other then dance.

Trivia:

Though they don’t get to do much in the way of dancing, Baby’s Houseman’s parents were played by Jerry Orbach and Kelly Bishop both Tony-award-winning Broadway dancers.


Kevin Smokler and Brat Pack America links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

DVD Talk interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Practical Classics
Salon interview with the author
Take Two interview with the author
WAMC interview with the author
WFPL interview with the author
WGN interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists Update - December 1st

The Largehearted Boy List of Online 'Best of 2016' Book Lists

For the ninth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find. As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating daily.

The Master List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online year-end book list I have missed.

Other daily updates to the 2016 master list.

Revisit previous years' collections of year-end book lists: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade).


Today's additions to the Online Year-end "Best of 2015" Book Lists:

Atlanta Journal Constitution (best cookbooks)
BOLO Books (top books)
Booktrust (new Christmas picture books)
Chicago Tribune (best cookbooks)
Delivering Grace (best books)
The Dirt (best books)
The Duquesne Duke (best books)
Entropy (best poetry books and collections)
Everett Public Library (best young adult and children's nonfiction)
Faith Gateway (favorite books for kids)
Gcaptain (best nautical books)
Geographical (books of the year)
Guardian (best biography and autobiography books)
Guardian (best history books)
Guardian (best politics books)
Iowa Public Radio (best children's books to give)
King County Library System (top books)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly - Julie (favorite books)
Lafayette Public Library (best picture books)
LibraryReads (favorite books)
Minneapolis Star Tribune (best books)
New York Times (best books)
Our Daily Read (best history books)
Peak Performance (favorite books)
Pulse (favourite Nigerian books)
Ramblings of A(nother) Frustrated Writer (top books)
Reading with Robin (favorite books)
Readings (comics and graphic novels)
Remodelista (best cookbooks)
Rick O'Shea (books)
San Francisco Chronicle Style (favorite books)
San Jose Mercury (best boozy books)
School Library Journal (great board books)
Seattle Times (best books)
Side Trek . NYC (best books)
Smart Football (best books)
Something Else Reviews (best Beatles books)
Spectator (best gardening books)
Telegraph (best gardening books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily updates to the master list

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - December 1, 2016

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Tove Jansson: Work and Love

Tove Jansson: Work and Love
by Tuula Karjalainen

The life of the legendary Finnish artist is beautifully detailed in this Tuula Karjalainen biography. Tove Jansson is the creator of the beloved Moomin universe, a whimsical world where bumbling creatures and pastel landscapes abound, and has published her English translations with Drawn and Quarterly. Karjalainen’s biography is rigorous in its detail and gentle in its depiction, as accurate of a reflection of its subject as one could hope for. Jansson’s personal life is examined next to her work as an artist, author, illustrator, storyteller, scriptwriter, lyricist, and painter. Karjalainen is a highly experienced Finnish art historian who will henceforth be known as the definitive Tove Jansson expert!


Fierce Femmes and Notorious Liars

Fierce Femmes and Notorious Liars
by Kai Cheng Thom

Subtitled “A Dangerous Trans Girl’s Confabulous Memoir”, Kai Cheng Thom's new book is a surreal waltz through queer coming-of-age. A young girl escapes a dreary, oppressive city in search of love and kinship and finds herself in the mystical “Street of Miracles”. What follows for our heroine is acceptance into a gang called the Lipstick Lacerators, glamorous debauchery, and much soul searching. A great read from Montreal publisher Metonymy Press!


Notes From a Feminist Killjoy: Essays from Everyday Life

Notes From a Feminist Killjoy: Essays from Everyday Life
by Erin Wunker

This collection by Erin Wunker—Chair of the Board of the national non-profit organization Canadian Women in the Literary Arts and co-founder of the feminist academic blog Hook & Eye—is the spiritual successor to Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me. The essays are air-tight, intertwining traces of memory and theory, the best kind of non-fiction. Wunker takes up the figure of the Feminist Killjoy and explores its political potential, bringing an essential stream of feminist theory to a wider public.


How to Survive in the North

How to Survive in the North
by Luke Healy

Arctic exploration, shipwreck, a graphic swirl of history and fiction, Luke Healy’s How to Survive in the North is a breath of (frigid) fresh air. The plot winds three stories concerning Vilhjalmur Stefansson, a Canadian explorer from the turn of the century, and spans a host of fleshed out character across a millennium. As we’ve come to expect from books published with Nobrow Press, the art is exceptional. Healy has crafted an excellent graphic novel which takes advantage of its dual modes of narration.


The Boat Rocker

The Boat Rocker
by Ha Jin


Ha Jin, author of acclaimed novels Waiting and War Trash, has penned an earnest, timely tale of the politics of contemporary literature and journalism. The Boat Rocker follows Danlin, a Chinese journalist whose fearless reporting on his government has granted him legendary status amongst readers and a red-alert from Communist officials. He is truly tested when he is assigned with investigating his ex-wife, a novelist who has willingly allowed herself to be exploited by the government in order to become a literary star. Jin’s prose is unadorned, weary, and moves like a panther. He is a master storyteller whose impressive new novel only bolsters his canon.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Shorties (New Haruki Murakami Novel Coming, Stream Maria Taylor's New Album, and more)

A new Haruki Murakami novel will be published in Japan in February.


NPR Music is streaming Maria Taylor's new album In the Next Life.


23 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Saturday (bringing the total number to 337), including The Guardian's best fiction, The Rumpus's best poetry books, and The Telegraph's best cookbooks.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Beer Money by Frances Stroh
Edward Unspooled by Craig Lancaster
Galapagos by Kurt Vonnegut
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
I Served the King of England by Bohumil Hrabal
Memento Mori by Muriel Spark
Memoirs by Tennessee Williams
Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut
The Nasty Bits by Anthony Bourdain
Seiobo There Below by László Krasznahorkai
The Sky Over Lima by Juan Gómez Bárcena
Slapstick by Kurt Vonnegut
Sweet Caress by William Boyd
Timequake by Kurt Vonnegut
Undermajordomo Minor by Patrick deWitt
Us Conductors by Sean Michaels
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Welcome to the Monkeyhouse by Kurt Vonnegut

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Beasts and Children by Amy Parker
You Better Not Cry: Stories for Christmas by Augusten Burroughs


The Fader profiled the band Girlpool.


The Millions interviewed author Danielle Dutton.


Angel Olsen broke down her track "Shut Up Kiss Me" on the Song Exploder podcast.


Signature recommended the best books about Oscar Wilde.


Stream Local Natives' cover of Kanye West's "Ultralight Beam."


Literary Hub recommended dystopian novels to inspire you to fight for your reproductive freedoms.


Stream a new Jenn Grant song.


The Millions has launched its annual Year in Reading feature, where authors recommend the best books they read in 2016.


Stream Hamilton Leithauser's cover of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man."


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Henrietta Rose-Innes's novel Nineveh.


Stream a new Julien Baker song.


Oregon Music News interviewed Patterson Hood of the Drive-By Truckers.


Bookworm interviewed author Peter Orner.


The Free Lance-Star profiled the band Bombadil.


Paste interviewed David Bazan about his holiday album Dark Sacred Night.


The Creative Independent interviewed author Roxane Gay.


Stream a recent live set by Thao and the Get Down Stay Down.


Tor.com listed its favorite Warren Ellis short stories.


The Creative Independent interviewed Kelley Deal of the Breeders.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

November 30, 2016

Book Notes - Marcy Dermansky "The Red Car"

The Red Car

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Marcy Dermansky's compelling novel The Red Car once again proves her a masterful storyteller.

The New York Times wrote of the book:

"Sharp and fiery…The novel’s furious action keeps the pages snapping by, but each incident, at times each sentence, is bubbling with equally furious ideas…There is, now, a literary term for a book you can’t stop reading that makes you stop to think. It is The Red Car.


In her own words, here is Marcy Dermansky's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Red Car:


Playlist: A Mystery


At the top of Page 188, Leah, the narrator of The Red Car, muses about what if would be like to take a trip with her husband in Big Sur. Because it would be vacation, she decides it would be a good time. Her husband would like it there. She would not have to drive. She would have to negotiate for music.

Here is the end of the paragraph:

He would also want to listen to music that I didn't like. And I would have to pretend that I didn't hate it. Or please with him to turn it down. Or negotiate for Beth Orton."

"La la la," he would say, making fun of my music.

I love Beth Orton. It pleased me to slip in that one line about her into Beth Orton in my novel. I am under the impression that not enough people know about Beth Orton, a British singer/songwriter who combines her melancholy music with a techno beat. You can dance to her music; you can also cry. "Pass in Time" is my favorite Beth Orton song to cry to.

This is my third playlist for largehearted boy. For my first novel Twins, I did it properly, creating a thoughtful playlist that matched the book – songs that would work incredibly well for a soundtrack to the novel. I picked many find songs and wrote about each song.

For Bad Marie, I went off a little bit off track. More than music, I wrote instead about Scarlett Johansson, almost a campaign for her to get the part in the movie that has as of yet never been made. I had listened to her album Anywhere I Lay My Head compulsively.

Now, here we are at Playlist Three: The Red Car and I am going off-road. I didn't think I could listen to an album more compulsively than the Scarlett Johansson until I started working on The Red Car. Because instead of listening to one album while I wrote, I narrowed down to a remix of a single Beth Orton song: "Mystery" from the album Sugaring Season. A composer named Nico Muhly recorded the song, "strip[ing] out the warmth at the center of "Mystery" and replacing it with a chilling wave of white noise that completely reframes the melody while maintaining its beauty," so says Stereogum which is where I found it.

The result is incredible. The song is moody and melancholy, hauntingly beautiful.

I fell in love with the song, I tweeted about it, and someone named Veronica contacted me via direct message. I sent her my address and she sent me an actual LP of the remix – as if I am the kind of cool enough person to own a record player. I do not. The letter also came with a code to download the song and that is what I did.

The download contained two versions of the song: one roughly seven minutes long and the other twelve. I would replay my remixes of "Mystery" over and over again. I'd go into another dreamy trance like state, which is how I best like to write.

That remix of "Mystery" seems like almost an otherworldly gift, almost as mysterious as a red car that can restore itself after a fatal car accident. I still have these two songs on an, eleven inch MacBook Air that I no longer use. The startup disk is full and it won't start up properly and instead of making the computer work again – something I imagine is possible -- I upgraded to a new computer.

If Leah were not too scared to take her hands off the steering wheel, "Mystery" is the song she would listen to. Over and over again.


Marcy Dermansky and The Red Car links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review
Los Angeles Times review
The Millions review
New York Times review
Newsday review
Publishers Weekly review
San Francisco Chronicle review

Interview magazine interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Bad Marie
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Twins
Los Angeles Review of Books interview of Books interview with the author

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists Update - November 30th

The Largehearted Boy List of Online 'Best of 2016' Book Lists

For the ninth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find. As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating daily.

The Master List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online year-end book list I have missed.

Other daily updates to the 2016 master list.

Revisit previous years' collections of year-end book lists: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade).


Today's additions to the Online Year-end "Best of 2015" Book Lists:

19 Acres (books)
Alpha Reader (favourite books)
Booktech Blogger (books)
BuzzFeed (best fiction books)
Challies (top books)
EarlyWord (XLS link) (spreadsheet of fiction and poetry books on major lists)
Entropy (best presses, magazines, publishers, journals)
Everett Public Library (best children's fiction and picture books)
Guardian (best crime fiction)
Guardian (best fiction)
Guardian (best SF and fantasy books)
Iowa Public Radio (best books to give)
Lafayette Public Library (top teen books)
O Magazine (best books)
Ottawa Citizen (best cookbooks)
Paste (best new novels translated into English)
The Portable Infinite (best books)
Readingatdewitt (best books)
Romance & Smut (best contemporary romance books)
Romance & Smut (best historical romance books)
The Rumpus (best poetry books)
Telegraph (best cookbooks)
Upon the Hearth (top books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily updates to the master list

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Fashion and Feminism, Stream Best Coast's Holiday Song, and more)

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talked fashion and feminism with the New York Times.


Stream Best Coast's new holiday song.


18 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Saturday (bringing the total number to 314), including the Washington Post's best cookbooks, the Guardian's best paperbacks, and the Telegraph's best crime fiction.


Stream a new Besnard Lakes song.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

An Atlas of Impossible Longing by Anuradha Roy
And After the Fire by Lauren Belfer
Black Sun by Edward Abbey
Church of Marvels by Leslie Parry
Collected Stories by Frank O'Connor
Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay
The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s by Peter Doggett
The Patron Saint of Liars by Ann Patchett
The Sealed Letter by Emma Donoghue
The Sisters Brothers by Patric deWitt
Speak by Louisa Hall
The Trouble with Lexie by Jessica Anya Blau

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster
Dirty Blvd.: The Life and Music of Lou Reed by Aidan Levy
Gone With the Mind by Mark Leyner
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
The Hidden Letters of Velta B. by Gina Ochsner
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
We Are Water by Wally lamb

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

Call Me by Your Name by Andre Aciman
The Color Purple Collection: The Color Purple, The Temple of My Familiar, and Possessing the Secret of Joy by Alice Walker


Gorilla Vs Bear shared a mix of November's best songs.


Brooklyn Magazine and the Chicago Review of Books interviewed Jason Diamond about his memoir Searching for John Hughes.

Diamond also shared a literary mixtape at Electric Literature and examines the literature of the north Chicago suburbs at The Millions.


Margo Price stopped by World Cafe's Nashville Sessions for a live performance and interview.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Gregory Pardlo.


NY1 interviewed Craig Finn and Tad Kubler of the Hold Steady.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Steven Church's essay collection One with the Tiger.


Stream a new Allo Darlin' song.


Signature recommended the best books about Hawaii.


PopMatters interviewed Mike Mills of R.E.M.


Tobias Carroll wrote about meals found in literature.


Thump shared a brief history of masked DJs.


Download the XO for the Holidays Vol. IX compilation.


Paste listed the best new novels translated into English.


Woodsy Pride has released a holiday EP.


Read a new story by Shelly Oria and Alice Sola Kim.


CLRVYNT interviewed Hamilton Leithauser of the Walkmen.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

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