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May 17, 2019

Shorties (Siri Hustvedt on Books and Reading, A New Book about Joy Division, and more)

Joy Division

Siri Hustvedt talked books and reading with the Guardian.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Jon Savages book, This searing light, the sun, and everything else: Joy Division: An Oral History.


May's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

The Great Santini by Pat Conroy
The White Album by Joan Didion


NYCTaper shared a recent performance by Meg Baird & Mary Lattimore.


Northwestern Now profiled author Rebecca Makkai.


Stream a new song by Hatchie.


Guy Gunaratne's debut novel, In Our Mad and Furious City, has been awarded the Dylan Thomas prize.


Stream a new song by Josephine Wiggs of the Breeders.


Bookworm interviewed poet Terrance Hayes.


Stream a new Bruce Springsteen song.


U.S. News and World Report examined Boston's acknowledgment of its literary history.


Carin Besser discussed co-writing lyrics or the National with The Creative Independent.


The Belfast Telegraph examined author Jean Rhys's songwriting past.


All Songs Considered recommended the week's best new albums.


BOMB interviewed author Peter Rock.


The Rumpus interviewed author Richard Chiem.


Literary Hub interviewed author Saskia Vogel.


Bandcamp Daily interviewed members of the band Team Dresch.


Guernica interviewed author Terese Svoboda.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists






May 16, 2019

Kenji C. Liu's Playlist for His Poetry Collection "Monsters I Have Been"

Monsters I Have Been

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Andrew Sean Greer, and many others.

Kenji C. Liu's uses his "franken-po" style, which remixes existing texts, to poignant and arresting effect in his brilliant poetry collection Monsters I Have Been.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Liu relishes the absurd and the happenstance, that 'tornado gorgeous' that becomes possible with a non-utilitarian approach to language."


In his own words, here is Kenji C. Liu's Book Notes music playlist for his poetry collection Monsters I Have Been:



Stream the playlist on YouTube


All of the songs on my playlist are variously embedded in my poetry collection, Monsters I Have Been (Alice James books). Since the “frankenpo” (Frankenstein poem) method I used to create many of the poems involves chopping up and piecing together bits of source materials, you will mostly find only fragments of these songs in the book.

Caetano Veloso, “Cucurrucucú Paloma”

This song might be best known to some from Pedro Almodóvar’s Hable Con Ella (2002). But my introduction to it was in the opening scenes of Wong Kar-Wai’s turbulent romance film Happy Together (1997). Leslie Cheung and Tony Leung Chiu-wai’s characters attempt to visit the Iguazu waterfalls in Argentina. Wong's film was one of the first I ever saw featuring a gay Asian couple, although their relationship was terrible.

Barbara Lewis, “Hello Stranger”

The film Moonlight (2016) gave this song a whole new tender meaning for me. The third portion of the film, when Black and Kevin meet again at the diner as adults, is interwoven with unanswered questions and erotic tension, which I try to explore in my poem of the same title.

Bon Odori Uta (traditional song)

Obon, the Japanese festival of the dead, is for me a magical way to mark late summer. Bon Odori Uta simply means Obon festival dancing song. After hearing it at the Gardena Obon, it took some digging to find, because it’s not actually from Japan. It was written by a Japanese American priest in California's Central Valley. My favorite part of the dance is when we swim forward with palms together.

Shigeru Umebayashi, ”Yumeji’s Theme”

Fans of Wong Kar-Wai will recognize this nostalgic waltz from his masterpiece, In the Mood For Love (2000). It was actually first used in an earlier Japanese film, but Wong gave it new life. It will always bring to mind the tightly contained camera shots of the interiors Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung Chiu-Wai navigated, with their noodles and repressed erotic feelings.

New Order, “Blue Monday”

How does it feel / to treat me like you do
When you’ve laid your hands upon me / and told me who you are

To me, this song is such a generational marker, the shared musical imagination of a certain period. It instantly inserts me in the moody lineage that Joy Division created for all of us long-hair-over-the-eye kids. And yet I don’t think I really considered the lyrics until years later—it’s a song about abuse.

Nazia Hassan, “Aap Jaisa Koi Meri Zindagi” (Qurbani soundtrack)

The writer Neela Banerjee invited me to write a poem in response to the Bollywood film Qurbani for her husband's birthday. Who am I to refuse such a glamorous commission? The scene featuring this song is a huge 70s-sideburns-wink-open-shirt innuendo, as is the rest of the film.

Prince, “Purple Rain”

Although I grew up in the '80s and '90s, I was a latecomer to Prince’s music because I didn’t pay much attention to Top 40 pop and rock. Shockingly I didn’t even see Purple Rain until a few years ago. After Prince’s death, I became fascinated with the song “Purple Rain,” because as a musician, I recognized the brilliance of what Prince did with a basic blues chord progression. The relevance of this song to my book, however, is the hot, gender-queer figure of The Kid. Prince created a realm of possibility where it was ok for men to not fit conventional gender standards.

Jimi Hendrix, “The Star-Spangled Banner” (Live at Woodstock, 1969)

Hendrix's version was basically a critique of US imperialism and militarism in Southeast Asia. With a single electric guitar, he turned the national anthem into an aural representation of war, a perfect reflection of the US' violent trajectory from Plymouth to Manifest Destiny and beyond.

Bonus Tracks

These songs are not in the collection, but they definitely influenced it.

“Asadoya Yunta” (traditional Okinawan song)
Akira Ifukube, “The Godzilla Theme” (Godzilla soundtrack)
Nicholas Britell, “Little’s Theme” (Moonlight soundtrack)


Kenji C. Liu and Monsters I Have Been links:

the author's website

Lantern Review review
Publishers Weekly review
RHINO review
Tupelo Quarterly review

Poets & Writers interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - May 16, 2019

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Laura Dean Keeps Breaking up With Me

Laura Dean Keeps Breaking up With Me by Mariko Tamaki & Rosemary Valero-O’Connell

On queer love, bffs, and toxic relationships set against the backdrop of high school discovery. For readers of Tillie Walden’s wise deep-feeling-good-looking comics, this story brings us into the world of young desire, and learning how to tell what is not good for you.


I Become a Delight to My Enemies

I Become a Delight to My Enemies by Sara Peters

From the new Strange Light imprint, highlighting experimental literature, comes this polyvocal story of lives lived in fear. Written in poetry and prose, set in the ambiguous town called “Town,” Peters creates an atmosphere of strangeness amidst recognition.


Lanny

Lanny by Max Porter

Also from the Strange Light imprint, Max Porter’s Lanny is a once-upon-a-time story where a young boy goes missing. The novel speaks through different modes of storytelling - myth, fairy tale, parable - as if under an incantatory spell in the middle of the forest.


Before I Was a Critic I Was a Human Being

Before I Was a Critic I Was a Human Being by Amy Fung

A radical collection of essays from critic, organizer, and curator Amy Fung who has worked in the arts across Canada for the past decade. She looks critically at Canada’s art world in her debut book and how it continually implicates itself in the systems of oppression it seeks to critique.


Cannonball

Cannonball by Kelsey Wroten

Described as “Art School Confidential for the Tumblr generation,” this comic is about being young, rebellious, and ambitious. It is also about desire, with the central figure Caroline crushing hard on a wrestler names Cannonball, lost in a fantasy world of love and heroism.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


Shorties (An Interview with Dani Shapiro, New Music from PJ Harvey, and more)

Dani Shapiro

Literary Hub interviewed author Dani Shapiro.


Stream a new PJ Harvey song.


May's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

At the End of the Century by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala


The Greensboro News & Record profiled Patterson Hood of the Drive-By Truckers.


Ask Men recommended inspiring memoirs.


Stream a new Rose Hotel song.


Thrillist and the Today Show recommended summer's best books.


Ani DiFranco talked books and music with the New York Times.


The Week examined the rise of literary miniseries.


Stream a new song by Arlo Day .


Lifehacker shared a playlist of songs about writing.


NPR Music is streaming Justin Townes Earle's new album The Saint of Lost Causes.


Granta shared a conversation between authors Lucy Ives and Niina Pollari.


NPR Music is streaming Sebadoh's new album Act Surprised.


Literary Hub interviewed author Saskia Vogel.


The Georgia Strait profiled singer-songwriter Jenny Lewis.


The Guardian recommended books about Sudan.


Stream a new song by Baroness.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Lydia Fitzpatrick.


Stream a new Holy Wave song.


Karen Russell discussed her new story collection Orange World with Poets & Writers.


Shannon Lay covered Karen Dalton's "Something on Your Mind."


Max Porter discussed his new novel Lanny with Hazlitt.

Read an excerpt from the book.


Stream a new Modern Nature song.


The Creative Independent interviewed author and translator Anna Moschovakis.


Bandcamp profiled musician Jamila Woods.


Jayson Greene discussed his memoir Once More We Saw Stars with Inside Hook.


Stream a new song by Joanna Sternberg.


1843 profiled author James Ellroy.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


May 14, 2019

John Glynn's Playlist for His Memoir "Out East"

Out East

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Andrew Sean Greer, and many others.

John Glynn's memoir Out East captures the spirit of youth and self-discovery.

The Millions wrote of the book:

"Sun-soaked and brimming with youth, Glynn's debut memoir chronicles a life-changing summer spent in a Montauk share house. With honesty, heart, and generosity, the memoir explores friendship, first love, and identity."


In his own words, here is John Glynn's Book Notes music playlist for his memoir Out East:



Out East is the story of The Hive, a Montauk summer house I shared with 31 other people. I was 27 at the time, and plagued by crippling self-doubt. Between Memorial Day and Labor Day, I fell in love with a guy for the first time. As I grappled with my identity, my housemates became my family. All of us sought music to crystallize our emotions.

My clickwheel iPod played a crucial role in the creative process for Out East. Its playlists form a card catalog of my life from my early 20s through today, the perfect conduit to memory. When I listened to my playlist from summer 2013, I was instantly transported back to the Hive, to gutting euphoria of first love and the intensity of my friendships that summer. Some of these songs appear in the book at pivotal junctures. All of them come from the original Montauk 2013 playlist on my iPod.

“Jubel” by Klingande

This song feels like magic hour on the beach—the moment when afternoon curls into evening, the crowds thin, and the light shifts. Sometimes my housemates and I would linger nearly until sunset, a group of ten or fifteen of us on a patchwork of beach towels. “Jubel” reminds me of the communal energy that wove through our friend group on those perfect summer evenings.

“ID (Wake Me Up)” by Avicii

Every portable beach speaker in Montauk was playing this song in summer 2013. It was a Hive anthem. We’d dance to it in our kitchen, stomp our feet, sing along. Then we’d cram into our friend Henry’s taxi van and let the night unfold. When Avicii died we mourned not only for him, but for a simpler moment in our lives.

“Do Ya Thang” by Rihanna

The guy I fell in love with in Montauk loved this song. I remember the first time he played it for me. It feels serene and youthful, and I picture it painted in hues of pink and purple. The lyrics describe an expansive type of coupledom, a recognition of a partner’s true nature. It reminds me of the starry nights the two of us spent together on the roof of the Hive, passing an AUX cord back and forth, speaking to each other through music.

“Hurricane” by MSMR

Our favorite song from summer 2013 was the CHVRCHES remix of this song. The original featured here is morose and dramatic, but the remix is effervescent and sun-blasted. It contorts pain into euphoria. Together the two versions capture the pendulum effect of life in our house, and the two competing narratives of first love.

“Second Summer (RAC Remix)” by Yacht

By the time I joined The Hive, it was already a fully established ecosystem, a house with rules and rituals and a language I learned through osmosis. Many of the housemates that summer were returning members. It was their second summer, and this song captured the layered nature of their experience.

“22” by Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift pulls off the most crucial trick of memoir—she taps into the universal through the specific. This was the song that was playing when we first pulled up to The Hive on the Thursday before Memorial Day Weekend.

“Pompeii” by Bastille

As I grappled with my sexuality, my biggest fear was that my emerging identity would irrevocably change my relationships with friends and family. The lyrics of this song spoke to me: “if you close your eyes, does it almost feel like nothing changed at all.” As I fell in love, I felt like I’d tapped into my most authentic self. But I prayed that, if I came out, nothing would change.

“The Mother We Share” by CHVRCHES

Out East is laced with flashbacks to my childhood in western Massachusetts. I grew up surrounded by a loving brood of cousins who were more like siblings. My grandmother Kicki was our matriarch. I think of her, my mom and my aunts, when I hear this song.

“Clarity” by Zedd

This song was a summer banger, but the lyrics also gets at the paradox of first love—how sometimes one person can be both the source of all your emotional anguish but also the only one who can alleviate it.

“Masquerade” by Nicki Minaj

The chorus of this song was meant to be sung drunk, at 2 am, around a kitchen island.


John Glynn and Out East links:

the author's website

Booklist review
Lambda Literary review
The Millions review
New York Journal of Books review
PopSugar review

Newsday interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Peter Rock's Playlist for His Novel "The Night Swimmers"

The Night Swimmers

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Andrew Sean Greer, and many others.

Peter Rock's The Night Swimmers is a complex and mesmerizing novel.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Haunting, elegiac . . . the book’s moody sense of hidden depths and dangers will intrigue those open to an atmospheric and contemplative novel."


In his own words, here is Peter Rock's Book Notes music playlist for his novel The Night Swimmers:


My novel The Night Swimmers involves, as the title suggests, people who swim at night. The book follows the connection between a young widow, Mrs. Abel, and the narrator, a man recently graduated from college. They meet in 1994, on the Door Peninsula of Wisconsin; at night, they swim long distances together, to islands and shoals. As their relationship becomes more perplexing to the narrator, Mrs. Abel’s unpredictable behavior leads them into increasingly mysterious and uncanny situations. And then the summer ends, and she suddenly disappears, leaving him behind.

Twenty years later, he returns to the same woods and lake with his two small daughters; confronted by the memories of that distant summer, his obsession with Mrs. Abel is rekindled. While he attempts to locate her, he also begins (in hopes that he might recollect what happened in the past) to swim distances again, to study old letters and other artifacts from that time, and to float in isolation tanks. The narrative that results incorporates these experiences and artifacts, as well as conversations with his daughters and forays into other resonant obsessions (dreams, psychic photography, talking animals, the watercolor painter Charles Burchfield, etc.).

The narrator’s explorations lead him deeper into the mysteries of that past summer, and also into his relationships with other women, before and after that time. As his efforts create new complications and intrigues, the past erupts into the present, and he must integrate the person he was with the one he’s become.

This playlist includes songs that arise within the narrative, songs from the times it explores, songs that I favored while writing the book, and many songs about swimming. Below, I’ll often append a short section from the novel, and/or pertinent thoughts. The Night Swimmers is many things, not least a collection and progression of love stories and ghost stories. Hopefully that is evident, here.


Vetiver – “Rolling Sea” from Tight Knit

Wouldn't you love to be out on the rollin' sea
With only the sky above you for a roof?

Here’s how my novel opens:

To swim with another person—out in the open water at night, across a distance, without stopping—is like taking a walk without the pressure, the weight of having to carry a conversation, to bring what is inside to the outside. Think of being with someone in a silent room, the tension in the air; water is thicker and you can’t talk, can’t stop moving. Instead, you’re together, struggling along, only glimpsing each other’s silhouetted arm or head for a moment, when you turn your face to breathe, a reassurance that you are not completely alone.

Lisa Hannigan – “Undertow” from At Swim

I want to swim in your current
Carry me out, up and away
I want to float
On every word you say

A little later in The Night Swimmers:

Books and experts claim that such vortices and currents don’t actually exist, that they are exaggerations born of people trying to swim against a rip tide—and yet, as I swim along the surface, I feel unseen weather, underwater winds.

Arthur Russell – “Maybe She” from Love Is Overtaking Me

Wonder if she knows I'm scared
Does she know I'm glad to meet her?
Standing with my feelings bare
She'll know when I start to greet her

I love this song so much. Its jaunty, happy sound, and its lyrics that strike a blithe “I don’t really care” pose that seems to cover up a fear that a show of commitment will be fatal to any possibility of success. And yet the vulnerability! So fine. Here is a resonant passage from my novel:

My relationships had always devolved into silence and inertia and then I moved somewhere else, began a new relationship, stayed as long as there was still the faintest momentum of the beginning, that excitement of the unknown. My stories worked this way, too. Plenty of abrupt endings, doors slamming, trucks on highways. I was afraid to be still, to stay in a room with another person. I had no clue what people might say to each other, past a certain point.

In his book Audition, Michael Shurtleff writes, “I then ask, ‘Why don’t you run? What keeps you there?’ The answer to these questions is what makes the actor able to function properly in the scene.”

I could never answer those questions. I was continually searching for a scene in which I’d be able to function properly, rather than finding or recognizing or creating the reasons to stay.

Marisa Anderson – “In Waves” from Into the Light

One time I did an event/fundraiser for the excellent Signal Fire Arts Residency; I read a story, and then Marisa played her guitar. Why, I thought, cannot I do something amazing like that?

REM – “Strange Currencies” from Monster

The fool might be my middle name
But I'd be foolish not to say
I'm going to make whatever it takes,
bring you up, call you down, sign your name, secret love,
make it rhyme, take you in, and make you mine.

The obvious REM song to choose, here, is “Nightswimming,” but that’s the obvious choice in all mixes. Monster was the album that came out in 1994, and I remember that orange CD with the strange bear’s face on the cover. I slipped that CD into my Discman and walked down to the beach, “the fool” my middle name. The yearning insistence of these lyrics!

M. Ward – “You Still Believe in Me” from Transistor Radio

Mixtapes were always used to show someone your feelings, and to convince this person that you were interesting and had taste, to make them think about you when you weren’t there. Strategizing, I often tried to put in an instrumental or two, so this person could ponder all the many words of the preceding songs, let them settle while allowing the emotions to be stoked. Too many words might get in the way of the feelings. (There’s probably a way this is true of novels, too; only the instrumentals, in that case, the music, also has to be made up of words.)

Bonnie Prince Billy – “My Home Is the Sea” from Superwolf

I have often said
that I would like to be dead
in shark's mouth
a woman swimming under
her warm breath sendin' a thunder
on two parts south
and love is stripped and frayed
and duty is delayed
until next life

Enough said.

Laura Cantrell – “Letters” from Humming at the Flowered Vine

Always felt much better
when I got me a letter

&

Wilco – “Box Full of Letters” from A.M.

I just can't find the time
To write my mind
The way I want it to read

My writing of this novel was interrupted by an email from an ex-girlfriend that ultimately ended up being included in the novel, and leading me back to the many letters I wrote (excerpts of which are also included in the novel) to her between the years 1990-97. The contents of these letters were startling to me. Here’s part of that email:

Yesterday I was in a sensory deprivation tank and experienced six very vivid brief hallucinations, each like a still photograph. One of them was of the small strip-mart where we did our laundry and ate brunch, in Ithaca, I think. Was it really called Suds Your Duds? I could see the edge of the truck and your hand on the steering wheel and little golden hairs sticking up on your wrist, and then part of the sign. It was a very strange brain event. I still have every letter you wrote for when you donate your literary papers to the Beinecke. Love to you and yours & hope to see you sometime soon.

Calexico – “Where Water Flows” from The Black Light

In 1968, James E. “Doc” Counsilman described feel for the water as a “nebulous quality” of great swimmers, but provided no real definition. While fast swimmers typically exhibit impressive technique elements, it is questionable that they are aware of any precise and definable feeling that produces their speed. In fact, some “feelings” (or perceptions) may limit their speed.

Cowboy Junkies – “A Common Disaster” from Lay It Down

A candle burning for everything I've ever wanted
A tattoo burned for everything I've ever wanted and lost
I had a long list of names that I kept in my back pocket,
But I've cut it down to one and your name's at the top

&

Neil Young – “Dreamin’ Man” from Harvest Moon

I’m a dreamin’ man,
Yes, that’s my problem
I can’t tell
When I’m not being real

That same ex-girlfriend’s email led me into the sensory deprivation tanks, and floating there somewhere between consciousness and unconsciousness, I traveled into the forgotten, the hypothetical, the past. The first time, floating in that densely salty water, in that darkness I was led right back to the early days in San Francisco, when I was courting my wife:

I know where I am now, by the light. I am in the time between that summer of Mrs. Abel and now. A woman rises from the bed and crosses the room—strong, her body so balanced and poised, no concern for being watched, no self-consciousness. Her hair is long and dark, a snarl across her shoulders; she tucks it back and I see the side of her face. This is San Francisco, 1996, and the walls are all white. Light carpet, a mirror that doubles her now, showing the other side of her body. A white shelf, a black CD boom box; I can even read the titles of her few CDs: Neil Young, Harvest; Cowboy Junkies, Lay It Down.

This woman is not yet my wife as she gets out of bed and crosses the room, stretching one bare arm, balancing on one foot. She pulls on the cord and the blind rises up, the whiteness of the fog cast in over her skin. She turns, smiling at me, and steps back toward the bed. In that glowing whiteness, there is no sound at all.

Willie Nelson – “Ou est-tu, Mon Amour” from Teatro

(She turned out to be my love.)

Califone – “Alice Marble Gray” from All My Friends Are Funeral Singers

Sip bourbon from her boot honey walls dunes drift inscription on a screaming birth levitation over softening strand alice marble gray a midnight swim a slight return a landscape rise a fractured fall driftwood boxes salt and bread a jelly glass a knife 2 guns a blanket and a spoon alice marble gray in pale arms like faraway bells the beach a cold kiss on the mouth ice water moon speed this heart

This excellent Califone song is actually about Alice Mabel Gray. She was a socialite, perhaps, who reputedly loved swimming naked in the lake. The locals called her “Diana of the Dunes,” as a tribute to her beauty and athleticism. She would dance on the beach in order to dry herself off, and she wasn’t always alone, she didn’t stay a recluse. Sometime in 1920, Alice met a drifter, an unemployed carpenter, and they had a child, a daughter. Reports say the carpenter was abusive; shortly after the birth of their second child, another daughter, Alice died of uremic poisoning, made worse by repeated blows on her back and stomach. The carpenter disappeared before he could be charged. Since the time of her death, people have reported the nude figure of a beautiful woman, running along the beach, swimming in the black waters of the lake at night.

Lucinda Williams – “Side of the Road” from Lucinda Williams

The last time I was honored to make such a mix for Largehearted Boy, for my 2013 novel The Shelter Cycle, I also included this song, which is a testament to how important it is to me. It also arises in narrative of The Night Swimmers:

My phone, plugged into the car’s stereo, played music I’d first heard over twenty years before, that I favored during that summer of Mrs. Abel. I listened as Lucinda Williams sang and it was as if I were back in the Red Cabin with the rain lashing the slanted, tar-papered roof. The strings swelled; her voice ratcheted up:

I walked out in a field, the grass was high, it brushed against my legs
I just stood and looked out at the open space and a farmhouse out a ways
And I wondered about the people who lived in it
And I wondered if they were happy and content.

The music also took me back to my adobe house in Mount Pleasant, after that summer; there, I had been so lonely that I had raised loneliness to the highest of attributes, completely necessary if one were to do anything worthwhile, or become someone, to become world in oneself, to draw another person to you and have them not be disappointed.

Tom Waits – “Get Behind the Mule” from Mule Variations
Tom Waits – “Murder in the Red Barn” from Bone Machine

I fumbled with cassette tapes, squinting to read the labels on the stickers; as I drove, I listened to Tom Waits sing, “Choppity-chop said the ax in the woods, you gotta meet me by the fall-down tree”; I imagined this as a kind of soundtrack to what I was doing, some kind of film where my trk sped along the desolate highway and the camera zoomed in, gradually, closer and closer to me, the music growing louder until it was as loud as it was in the cab of my truck, where I would be staring out through the windshield with a resolute expression on my face.

I drank coffee, ate licorice, turned the song up louder. Sioux Falls and on into Minnesota. Rochester, La Crosse. I whispered along to the words of the song, and actually it wasn’t that song at all, that can’t be right—that album came out in 1999, years later. I was actually listening to “When the moon is a cold-chiseled dagger, sharp enough to draw blood from a stone” or “Someone’s crying in the woods, someone’s burying all his clothes. Roadkill has its seasons, just like anything. It’s possums in the autumn, and it’s farm cats in the spring.”

Yo La Tengo – “Tired Hippo” from And then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out

This album!

Great Lake Swimmers – “Great Lake Swimmers” from Great Lake Swimmers

The currents want to pull you down
The bottom is empty, invisible
Where is the shore
Oh I can't see it anymore

Lake Michigan is my favorite Great Lake, but they are all great.

Musée Mécanique – “Along the Shore” from Shores of Sleep (*instrumental version)

A beauty. And half of this band, Sean Ogilvie, teaches piano and guitar to my daughters. Thanks, Sean!


Peter Rock and The Night Swimmers links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Book Reporter review
Kirkus review
New York Journal of Books review
Publishers Weekly review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


David Ebenbach's Playlist for His Poetry Collection "Some Unimaginable Animal"

Some Unimaginable Animal

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

David Ebenbach's poetry collection Some Unimaginable Animal is enveloping and compassionate.

The Millions wrote of the book:

"A funny, tender, inviting collection, whose traits come from Ebenbach’s gifts of storytelling."


In his own words, here is David Ebenbach's Book Notes music playlist for his poetry collection Some Unimaginable Animal:



I think this Book Notes series is a great thing, a public service by Largehearted Boy, and not just for the reader who gets to discover music; it’s also a service for the writer who’s assembling the playlist. Books rotate around obsessions—for example, my new poetry collection Some Unimaginable Animal, with its poems upon poems about food and animals and aging and more food, poems about the physicality of existence—and making a playlist reminds me that I’m not alone in this. Songwriters and a lot of other people have been obsessed with these things, too.

And why shouldn’t we be? Physical interests and needs drive our lives. And instead of letting that be a disappointment (“Is this all life is? A bunch of meals and then we die?”), what I want to do, and what these songs invite us to do, is to celebrate these fleshy facts. To see our raw, animal bodies as access— possibly our only reliable access—to the sacred.


Cab Calloway, “Everybody Eats When They Come to My House”

My book begins with the poem “Basket and Kneading-Trough,” which is about the extremely food-centric approach to life that was passed down to me by my father. You come into his house and there’s food all over the place—probably a meal getting prepared, sure, but also a tray of snacks coming out and even just bowls of chocolates and nuts or whatever scattered around casually, as if to say, Don’t worry—the universe is very abundant. Or, in the words of my poem, “There should be food at the front door—/we deserve it—the house all support staff/for the cabinets, the fridge.” Or, as Cab Calloway says, “All of my friends are welcome. Don’t make me coax you, moax you—eat the tables, the chairs, the napkins—who cares? You gotta eat if it chokes ya!”

Cannonball Adderley, “To Life”

Adderley’s phenomenal jazz interpretation of “To Life” is instrumental, but I still hear the lyrics from The Fiddler on the Roof in my head: “Life has a way of confusing us,/Blessing and bruising us./Drink, l’chaim, to life!” I love the musical’s attitude (and it’s a very Jewish attitude, I think) that life is both difficult and worth celebrating. My book (and it’s a pretty Jewish book, I think) wholeheartedly agrees.

Kiev, “Animals in Garden”

As the chorus of this song-plea for species-wide humility goes, “How on earth can we believe we’re in charge here?/Throw all of our weight all you want/We are just animals in garden.” I felt that way when I wrote my poem “City of Wilderness”: “There are no cities. Just these/breaks in the trees, and all the animals—”

How to Destroy Angels, “Fur-Lined”

If there’s one take-home message in this book, it’s the words of lead singer Mariqueen Maandig from this track: “I am just an animal.” And, really, that’s a pretty miraculous thing to be.

Peter Gabriel, “Shock the Monkey”

There’s a monkey on the cover of Some Unimaginable Animal because, if ever there was proof that we’re members of the animal kingdom, it’s in a monkey’s face. I love the knowledge that we’re part of that enormous family. My poem “The First Primate” encourages us to think about where we all came from. “The first primate clung to bark/knowing that all it took/was one loose grip, and it was back/to the forest floor.”

Cake on Cake, “Animals and Humans”

This strange song almost seems to be describing Some Unimaginable Animal: “There is a book,” it says, “with stories about animals and humans.” And, as if that weren’t enough, the name of the band (a Swedish experimental group) is food—a pile of food. Not just cake, but cake on cake.

A Tribe Called Quest, “Ham ’N’ Eggs”

This is probably the first (only?) popular song to address the dangers of high-cholesterol food, so there was never any doubt that I would include this track in the playlist.

Ferron, “I Am Hungry”

“I am hungry. How are you?” Ferron sounds hungry in this song. Actually, she sounds hungry in most of her songs, but especially in this one. And so I naturally thought of it when looking at my poem “Hunger.” What I’m talking about is “not the temporary hunger,/the blood-sugar plummet/…/instead the long hunger,/the hunger of the march/and the door that won’t lock—/…/Real hunger, with a jaw of its own—”

Bright Eyes, “First Day of My Life”

Some Unimaginable Animal is very interested in first days: The poem “The First Debate” imagines the moments that began the universe’s existence; the poems “The First Insect,” “The First Mammal,” and “The First Primate” contemplate how those taxonomic lineages might have started out. Beginning is not easy, of course, as this song reminds us: “I don't know where I am, I don't know where I've been.” But hopefully “I know where I want to go.”

Kaleo, “Glass House”

One of the recurring themes of Some Unimaginable Animal is the fragility of physical existence. The poems “Sukkot” and “Dwelling” reference the Jewish fall holiday that’s all about impermanence and the fact that none of our houses (literal or metaphorical) will stand forever. Poems like “Age,” “The Meadow Burns,” and “Our Memory for a Blessing Right Now” are about our bodies, those equally impermanent homes.

Deadmau5, “Ghosts ‘n’ stuff”

I added this Deadmau5 song (5ong?) because of my poem “Ghost Stories,” in which I declare my intention to write a Jewish ghost story. Ghost stories usually suggest that bad things happen for a reason (you built your house on what?!?), whereas I want to write one “for the people/who know to expect the worst regardless,” one that includes “the haunting/of the innocent.” That’s Jewish horror—not to mention a fair amount of Jewish history.

Jose Gonzalez, “Storm”

The world regularly reminds us of our physical limitations and fragility, and weather is one of its main tools. In “Snowstorm” I write about a blizzard that will “cover what was here before us. It’ll pull under what we’ve left in place.”

Craig Taubman, “Hayom”

And then the book ends with a poem called “This Happened to Me.” Does it make the poem sound dumb if I admit that it’s basically about a very nice, pleasant, springlike day? “The forecasters/were predicting a half a foot overnight,/but during this day dogs were/at the distant ends of their leashes, dogs everywhere.” Well, the song “Hayom” (“Today”), which is actually a prayer from the Jewish High Holy Days liturgy set to music by Craig Taubman, is a reminder: a single day, a single, physical episode in this physical universe of ours, can be staggeringly, life-changingly important.


David Ebenbach and Some Unimaginable Animal links:

the author's website

The Millions review

Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for The Guy We Didn't Invite to the Orgy

also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Beth Alvarado's Playlist for Her Essay Collection "Anxious Attachments"

Anxious Attachments

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Andrew Sean Greer, and many others.

Beth Alvarado's essay collection Anxious Attachments stuns with its poignancy and humanity.

The New York Journal of Books wrote of the book:

"Alvarado includes the references to current events, politics, social issues, and science, not because she's trying to make these personal essays about more than herself, but because they are about more than herself. Going from the intensely personal to the political, the social, the scientific, is what makes these essays universal."


In her own words, here is Beth Alvarado's Book Notes music playlist for her essay collection Anxious Attachments:



Since Anxious Attachments is a collection of essays about events that took place over the forty years of my marriage and the years after, as I’ve been grieving my husband’s death, the music that evokes those memories and so informs my writing also ranges widely. The easiest way to approach composing a playlist, then, was essay by essay, song by song, but often, there was a constellation of songs for an essay. As I listened to the songs again, they gave rise to memories that do not appear in the essays themselves but resonate with them.

In a Town Ringed by Missiles

When you’re nodding out, you want music that drifts. But since this is an essay about quitting heroin, I choose Blind Faith’s “I Can’t Find My Way Home.” “Come down off your throne / and leave your body alone. / Somebody must change. / You are the reason I’ve been waiting so long. / Somebody holds the key. / But I’m near the end / and I just ain’t got the time. / Oh, I’m wasted / and I can’t find my way home.” This seemed as prophetic as Rilke’s (of whom, then, I had not yet heard), “there is no place / that does not see you. You must change your life.”

Shelter

We, the counselors and house parents and volunteers, drank a lot at a bar across the street from the Shelter Care. We called it “the annex,” because whoever wasn’t on duty taking care of the run-aways could be found there drinking their blues away. No surprise, given that Louis, the counselor, and Fernando and I were all ex-heroin addicts, but everyone else drank as much as we did. It was the nature of the work. Even the director, Kathy, an ex-nun, could knock back the shots. Rickie Lee Jones, especially “Danny’s All-Star Joint,” conjures those days, the smoky, jittery chaos of both the bar and the shelter, the “halfway house on a one-way street.”

The Motherhood Poems

Flash forward to 2005 and the birth of our first grandchild. Two months premature and only four pounds, he looked like nothing so much as a shar-pei puppy. The song that most reminds me of those drives to LA to visit the baby in the NICU? “Me Gustas Tú” by Manu Chao. It was quirky and catchy and had a sense of urgency: “¿que voy hacer? / je ne sais pas / ¿que voy hacer? / je ne sais plus / ¿que voy hacer? / je suis perdu / ¿que hora son, / mi corazón?”

Clarity

My mother had sung in the chorus of the San Francisco Opera when she was in college. Bizet and Puccini were her favorites, but we never listened to Madame Butterfly, because it reminded her too much of her first husband who had been killed in the Korean War. If I want to feel close to my mother and to the loss that defined her life, all I have to do is hear the opening notes of the aria, “Un bel di, vedremo.”

Notes from Prague

“The national anthem of jealousy,” someone on YouTube calls the lyrics from “Mr. Brightside” by The Killers. Across the street from the apartment my daughter and I rented in Prague, there was a youth hostel with a neon red arrow that pointed up the stairs. At night there was loud music and young couples followed the arrow and then sat on couches, kissing. It was hot that summer. Our floor-to-ceiling windows were open for air, but when I wanted to sleep, I closed them, hoping for quiet. Too hot without air, without air conditioning, without fans, and Kathryn wanted the windows open, so she gave me her IPod, but this is what was on it: “Mr. Brightside.” Red Hot Chili Peppers, “Dosed.” Gnarls Barkley, “Crazy.” TV on the Radio, “Wolf Like Me.” Beck, “Lost Cause.” The playlist of her divorce.

Days of the Dead

Audioslave, “Like a Stone,” makes me feel that Fernando had a premonition of his own death, that it was coming sooner rather than later. I could see why he identified so much with the brooding music, with the lyrics’ regrets and religious overtones. I remember wishing he didn’t love this song so much, that something else, something more hopeful, would speak to him, but after he died, I played it over and over for a while because it made me feel closer to his sorrow than my own.

Stars and Moons and Comets

He said “American Girl” by Tom Petty reminded him of me, but I liked “Young Americans” by David Bowie. He liked “Romeo and Juliet” by Dire Straits, but I preferred “Sultans of Swing.” Van Morrison: I’d choose “Have I Told You Lately,” but he liked “Moondance” better. “Crash” by Dave Matthews Band, he loved that one, while I always wanted to dance to “Just Like Heaven” by The Cure. “Bittersweet” by Big Head Todd and the Monster, we both loved that one.

Anxious Attachments

After Fernando died, I spent the summer with Kathryn in Oregon. We were polishing the stone of our grief. We drove a lot, listening to CDs she had burned for our trips. Of Monsters and Men. “Little Talks.” When it started, there were horns and a snappy tune and a chorus of voices, “Hey!”—and so, every time, the upbeat music failed to prepare me for the nearly apocalyptic lyrics, the bodies on ships and “the screams that all sound the same.” The song is a duet that alternates between a man’s voice and a woman’s and the story that unfolded was just like mine: “You’ve gone, gone, gone away, / I watched you disappear / All that’s left is a ghost of you.”

Water in the Desert

After Fernando died, I had a housemate. It was the only way I could hang on to the house until I could sell it, but the woman who lived with me was very sensitive. She liked to go to bed at 8 p.m. and so, if I wanted to watch TV, I had to turn the volume down very low. If I laughed, even a quick breathy ha! ha! exhale of air, she would come out of her room and glare at me. Music would not help, she said, nor a white noise machine, nor a fan. Sometimes, though, she would go away and then I would pour a glass or two or three of wine and crank it up and dance and sing. I always started with Santigold by Santigold, “L.E.S. Artistes,” “Shove It,” “Say Aha,” and then “Creator,” as a way of both exorcising the house and of allowing my body to vibrate with sound.

Los Perdidos

When I was in Guanajuato with my cousin, we listened to strolling mariachi bands as we sat outside to eat. “Volver, Volver,” about a lover promising he will return, has always been my favorite ranchera. When I hear it, I want to dance, even though Fernando always told me that dancing with me was like wrestling. Yes, I would agree, it was. I never learned to follow.

Ordinary Devotions

When I was sixteen, my mother made me take voice lessons in case I wanted to “sing for my husband when he came home from work.” At least, that was the rationale she gave me. She also sent me to Charm School. If nothing else, this tells you how much my Bohemian attire and slovenly habits dismayed her. At any rate, before my recital, she gave me a shot of whiskey to calm my nerves. Years later, maybe decades, she told me that she was humiliated when I sang “Mercedes Benz,” something I wish she had kept to herself because, in my memory, I’m killing it, nailing every note.

Cautionary Tales

That claustrophobic summer of the wildfires, Kathryn and I played a CD of lullabies based on Grateful Dead songs and we watched Classical Baby. The Babies each had their favorites, even at this age, when they were barely crawling, but one of mine was “Sleepy Lion” by Miriam Makeba, which reminded me of my older sister and “The Lion Sleeps Tonight,” a forty-five she used to play when she was babysitting us.

Die Die Die

When I went to help my son, Michael, renovate his new house, I discovered that he and I had the same playlist—mine, of course, heavily influenced by playlists Kathryn had created on my laptop. Foo Fighters, REM, Soundgarden, the Fugees, Beasty Boys, Alanis Morissette, Prince. Such an odd moment when I realized that I was nostalgic for my children’s adolescence, not my own.

Thirteen Ways of Looking at Grief

If I were to make a playlist for Fernando, it would be filled with guitar music. Eric Clapton, George Harrison, Duane Allman, Jerry Garcia, Santana, B B King, Steve Winwood, Mark Knopfler. And Hendrix. Of course, Hendrix. Especially “Little Wing.” If, when someone dies, the person we were inside of them also dies, then this is the girl I am mourning when I mourn Fernando.


Beth Alvarado and Anxious Attachments links:

the author's website

High Desert Journal review
New York Journal of Books review

Bend Magazine interview with the author
Literary Hub essay by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Shorties (Chelsea Manning Will Publish a Memoir, New Music from the National, and more)

The National

Chelsea Manning will publish a memoir early next year.


The National shared a short film featuring new music.


May's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

Genius by James Gleick
The Lords of Discipline by James Conroy
Proust Was a Neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer


The Quietus previewed May's cassette releases.


Southern Living previewed summer's best books.


Stream a new song by V.V. Lightbody.


Authors discussed their books' one word titles at Mirriam-Webster.


Stream a new Kelly Moran.


Locus interviewed author G. Willow Wilson.


Aquarium Drunkard interviewed singer-songwriter Cate Le Bon.


The New Yorker interviewed cartoonist Tom Gauld.


Stream a new Spirits Having Fun song.


Democracy Now! interviewed author Arundhati Roy.


Paste interviewed Charly Bliss's Eva Hendricks.


Rion Amilcar Scott discussed his forthcoming story collection, The World Doesn't Require You, with Auburn Avenue.


Stream a new Yohuna song.


American Libraries interviewed author Sandra Cisneros.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


May 13, 2019

Shorties (An Interview with Richard Powers, Two Interviews with Lucy Dacus, and more)

Richard Powers

The Guardian interviewed author Richard Powers.


Weekend Edition and Paste interviewed singer-songwriter Lucy Dacus.


May's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

eBook on sale for $3.99 today:

Our Man in Havana by Graham Greene


Stereogum reconsidered the Drive-By Truckers album Pizza Deliverance on its 20th anniversary.


Bookworm interviewed author Nafissa Thompson-Spires.


Stream two new songs by Kelly Lee Owens.


Town and Country recommended May's best new books.


PopMatters delved into Deerhunter's discography.


The Evening Standard recommended books for summer reading.


Holly Herndon talked to Noisey about her new album, PROTO.


The Guardian recommended books about sports outlier.


Radio New Zealand interviewed Jeff Tweedy.


Siri Hustvedt discussed her favorite books at Vulture.


Stream a new Bjork song.


T.C. Boyle talked to Weekend Edition about his new novel, Outside Looking In.


Stream a new Anika Kyle song.


Seth shared the inspiration behind his graphic novel Clyde Fans at the Globe and Mail.


The Guardian profiled author Will Eaves.



The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Harold Bloom.


The New York Times examined Las Vegas as a literary hub.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


May 10, 2019

Shorties (An Excerpt from Vivian Goldman's New Book, An Interview with Thom Yorke, and more)

Revenge of the She-Punks: A Feminist Music History from Poly Styrene to Pussy Riot

Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Vivian Goldman's book, Revenge of the She-Punks: A Feminist Music History from Poly Styrene to Pussy Riot.


Crack interviewed Thom Yorke.


May's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

Under the Sea Wind by Rachel Carson

eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan


Stream a new Haybaby song.


Discover magazine recommended summer's best science books.


Ohmme played a Tiny Desk Concert.


Oprah recommended books for Mental Health Awareness Month.


SPIN listed the Cure's best songs of the 1980s.


The CBC recommended books for your mother.


MTV profiled the band Charly Bliss.


Bookworm interviewed author Nafissa Thompson-Spires.


Noted profiled Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy.


Guernica interviewed author Sheila Heti.


Wicked Local interviewed musician Richard Thompson.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Chia-Chia Lin’s debut novel The Unpassing.


Ben Gibbard covered Minor Threat's "Filler."


The Millions interviewed author Tyrese Coleman.


St. Vincent's Annie Clark shared the backstory behind her album Actor.


Guernica interviewed author Laila Lalami.


Stream a new Beachheads song.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Ben Okri.


Stream two new Summer Camp songs.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists


May 9, 2019

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - May 8, 2019

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Exhalation

Exhalation by Ted Chiang

Inspiring the award-winning film Arrival with his debut collection, Stories of Your Life and Others, Chiang is back again with nine stories, from rare classics to previously unpublished work, exploring poignant new ground with portals through time, alien scientists, and literacy-destroying search engines.


New Daughters of Africa

New Daughters of Africa by Margaret Busby (editor)

A staggering international collection of the writing of over 200 women of African descent, New Daughters of Africa spans centuries, continents, and every genre imaginable with contributions from some of the greatest writers of today, including Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Yrsa Daley-Ward, Edwidge Danticat, Esi Edugyan, Roxane Gay, Imbolo Mbue, Nnedi Okorafor, Zadie Smith and many, many more.


Rabbits for Food

Rabbits for Food by Binnie Kirshenbaum

With Paul Beatty calling Rabbits for Food “psychiatric dayroom dark and just as funny,” Kirshenbaum’s newest novel delves deep into the crisis of art-making, loneliness, love, and hospitalization, with an acerbic New York writer protagonist whose New Year’s Eve breakdown sees her admitted to a prestigious hospital and refusing all forms of treatment.


Call me American

Call me American by Abdi Nor Iftin

Abdi Nor Iftin’s path to becoming an American seems almost unbelievable: learning English from American pop and Arnold Schwarzenegger movies, posting secret dispatches from al-Shabaab-controlled Somalia to a worldwide audience, winning the annual visa lottery. Now in Maine and working toward citizenship, Iftin is sharing this dramatic memoir, a must-read for an age of increasing immigration crisis.


Revenge of the She-Punks

Revenge of the She-Punks by Vivien Goldman

Concentrating on four main themes--identity, money, love, and protest--music journalist and post-punk musician Vivien Goldman tells the liberating, visceral story of women and punk through interviews, history, and personal experience. From Patti Smith and Poly Styrene to Grace Jones and Blondie, Revenge of the She-Punks is a carousing, celebratory musical tour.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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