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August 19, 2014

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - August 19, 2014

Orenda Fink

Orenda Fink's Blue Dream is by far my favorite new release this week.

Imogen Heap's Sparks and Literature's Chorus are new albums I can also recommend.

Three Fela Kuti albums have been reissued on vinyl, Confusion, Sorrow, Tears and Blood, and Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense

What new releases are you picking up this week? What can you recommend? Have I left anything noteworthy off the list?


This week's interesting music releases:

Addison Groove: Turn Up the Silence EP
Apache Dropout: Heavy Window
Ark Life: The Dream of You and Me
Arndales: Dog Hobbies USA
Aviator: Head in the Clouds, Hands in the Dirt
Bahamas: Bahamas Is Afie
Bebel Gilberto: Tudo
Benjamin Booker: Benjamin Booker
Bishop Allen: Lights Out
Bob Carpenter: Silent Passage (reissue)
Botanist: VI: Flora
The Brokeoffs: Restless Leg
Buddy: Last Call for the Quiet Life
Caroline Rose: I Will Not Be Afraid
Castanets: Decimation Blues
Christian Gregory: Count On You
Connections: Into Sixes
Cream: Best of Cream
Crime: Murder By Guitar
Daniel Johnston: Fun (reissue) [vinyl]
Electric Würms: Musik, Die Schwer zu Twerk
Empire! Empire! (I Was a Lonely Estate): You Will Eventually Be Forgotten
Fela Kuti: Confusion (reissue) [vinyl]
Fela Kuti: Sorrow, Tears and Blood (reissue) [vinyl]
Fela Kuti: Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense (reissue) [vinyl]
The Human League: Dare! (reissue) [vinyl]
Imogen Heap: Sparks
Israel Nash: Rain Plans
Japan: Tin Drum (reissue) [vinyl]
Jenny Hval and Susanna: Meshes of Voice
Jessica Hernandez and the Deltas: Secret Evil
jj: V
Joel Gion: Apple Bonkers
John Lennon: Shaved Fish (reissue [vinyl]
Joy: Under the Spell of Joy
Julia Holter: Tragedy [vinyl]
Kimbra: The Golden Echo
The Kinks: Lola Versus Powerman & The Moneygoround, Part One
The Last Internationale: We Will Reign
Liam Bailey: Definitely Now
Literature: Chorus
Moon Duo: Live in Ravenna
Music Go Music: Impressions
Octagrape: Emotional Oil
The Offspring: Smash 20th Anniversary Reissue [vinyl]
Opera Multi Steel: Opera Multi Steel [vinyl]
Orenda Fink: Blue Dream
Pallbearer: Foundations of Burden
Peliroja: Injusticia
The Posies: Failure
Punch: They Don't Have to Believe
Roedelius: Flieg Vogel Fliege
Sarah Jaffe: Don't Disconnect
Sleeping Bag: Deep Sleep
Smoke Dawson: Fiddle
Snow Patrol: A Hundred Million Suns (reissue) [vinyl]
Souls of Mischief: There Is Only Now
Spiritualized: Fucked Up Inside (reissue) [vinyl]
Spiritualized: Let It Come Down (reissue) [vinyl]
Statik Selektah: What Goes Around
Tashi Dorji: Tashi Dorji
Various Artists: Kompakt Total 14
Various Artists: Look Again To The Wind: Johnny Cash's Bitter Tears Revisited
Wiz Khalifa: Blacc Hollywood


also at Largehearted Boy:

weekly music release lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)





August 19, 2014

Shorties (Dani Shapiro on Memoir Writing, Stream the New Gemma Ray Album, and more)

Dani Shapiro discussed memoir writing at the New Yorker.


MOJO is streaming the new Gemma Ray album Milk for Your Motors.


YAY!LA interviewed author Jim Ruland.


SPIN interviewed singer-songwriter Sharon Van Etten.


The Guardian shared a guide to Chicago in literature.


Weekend Edition interviewed singer-songwriter Imogen Heap.


Guernica interviewed author Karen Russell.


Pitchfork listed the 100 best albums of the decade so far.


Fresh Air interviewed Stephan Erik Clark about his debut novel Sweetness #9.

Read an excerpt from the book.


NPR Music is streaming the new Shovels and Rope album Swimmin' Time.


Flavorwire listed 25 authors who wrote great books before they were 25.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (BRONCHO, Split Screens, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

BRONCHO: An Introduction to BRONCHO EP [mp3]

Christian Lopez Band: Will I See You Again EP [mp3]

Grey Lakes: Faking Love Is Hard: Part One EP [mp3]

involved: "Machiavella" [mp3] from Revolving Maze

Split Screens: "Home" [mp3] from Before the Storm (out September 2nd)

Various Artists: I Am Shark Compilation, Volume 3 album [mp3]

Various Artists: VOLKOREN 10 compilation album [mp3]

WASHA: The Bright, Part 1 EP [mp3]

Wild Skies: Wild Skies EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

The Deep Dark Woods: HearYa session [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

August 18, 2014

Book Notes - Wendy C. Ortiz "Excavation"

Excavation

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Wendy C. Ortiz's memoir Excavation is as beautifully written as it is powerful, and is one of the most moving books I have read in years.

Lidia Yuknavitch wrote of the book:

"The time has finally arrived when women are telling the truth--the hard truths, the messy, glorious, loud, tender, screeching corporeal truths--about their lives as they live them and not lived as we are asked to live them. Wendy C. Ortiz's writing will rearrange your DNA. Permanently, beautifully..."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Wendy C. Ortiz's Book Notes music playlist for her memoir Excavation:


Much of my work—personal essays and definitely my books, Excavation: A Memoir, and the forthcoming Hollywood Notebook—often have an embedded soundtrack that shows up in lyrics I mention or place in the prose, all of which are really part of an overarching musical autobiography. This most notably comes up in "Mix Tape," an essay in mix tape form about the trajectory of the relationship documented in Excavation, which appeared in The Nervous Breakdown and was how Kevin Sampsell of Future Tense Books came across my writing.

(Interested in other music-related writing links? Here are a couple more:

"Listen" in The Coachella Review: http://thecoachellareview.com/nonfiction/listen_wendyortiz.html

"The History of Led Zeppelin in my Pants" in Split Lip Magazine:

http://www.splitlipmagazine.com/#!6-wendy-ortiz/c1d7b)

(one) Music Playlist for Excavation: A Memoir by Wendy C. Ortiz (it could look different tomorrow!)

"She’s Leaving Home" by The Beatles
Mr. Ivers nurtured an appreciation in me for early Beatles that later gave way to a hatred of early Beatles. This is a song I listened to often, probing and investigating it, because he sang it to me and said the words reminded him of me.

"Little Girls" by Oingo Boingo
My first adult-supervised concert was Oingo Boingo at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles. Sick as it is, I memorized all the words to this song at a young age, half-conscious of its connection to my life.

"Lie to Me" by Depeche Mode
DM’s album "Some Great Reward" played constantly in my early teenage bedroom. Once I began applying song lyrics to what I was experiencing in my relationship with Mr. Ivers this song felt incredibly true and reflected the shaky angst I felt.

"Dirty Woman" by Pink Floyd
In the midst of my new wave + gothiness I took a left turn into hippie territory and "discovered" Pink Floyd The Wall. At fourteen, seeing the scene in the movie that this song is featured in, I knew something was maybe different about me. I was not a groupie—never was—but something about the Girl in Pink Pants turned me on, looked familiar, clued me into something about myself—that I then I tried to practice, document in my relationship with Mr. Ivers.

"Shake It" David Bowie
This song appears in the chapter "June 1987." It’s a song I still lean on for its upbeat weird new-wave-ness to get me through hikes. It’s not my favorite Bowie song by far but it was the 45 that played often that summer. Bowie crooning, So when you gonna phone me made my heart beat faster. Still does.

"Stand by Me" covered by John Lennon/ "Stand by Me" by Ben E. King
In "July 1987" I describe a confirmation party, and the first instance when I slow-danced with Mr. Ivers, who I was learning to call "Jeff." The song playing was Ben E. King’s "Stand by Me." I grew to loathe that song because it seemed to describe the opposite of what he and I were developing. In a scene from "Fall 1989" in Jeff’s apartment, what is not noted is that John Lennon’s version of "Stand by Me" played on his radio as we lie in bed together, and we both remembered having danced to the original.

"Dazzle" by Siouxsie and the Banshees
This song appears in the chapter "August 1987," a point at which my teenage hormones had reached a crescendo and had nowhere to be channeled. When I listen to it now I get a kick out of the big drama of the music and its orchestration. It can still leave me in tears but I will try to hide them from you.

"White Lines" by Grandmaster Flash
This song was popular on KROQ in Los Angeles in the 1980s. It played at the one of the four dances I went to in high school, just not the one I had asked senior upperclassman Dennis Monroe to. Or maybe it did. All I remember is that I wore a flowing red vintage red dress I fashioned into a toga and danced, singing every single line of this song as it blasted into the dark auditorium.

"Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie" by Black Flag
While I was busy becoming a hippie my similarly-aged boyfriend was moving from metal to punk. I spent many afternoons and nights unconsciously taking in Black Flag lyrics and growing to love the music he and his friends tried to emulate in band practice. This song also speaks to the need, the intense need I felt through those years.

"Institutionalized" by Suicidal Tendencies
Somehow this young hippie acquired a copy of the first Suicidal Tendencies album and like many of her friends, got super into it. In Excavation: A Memoir there’s no direct mention of suicidality but it lingered in the shadows often. If my peers couldn’t relate to "Institutionalized" on a surface level, I couldn’t totally understand them, and, I imagined, them, me. I was never into Pepsi, though.

"The End" by The Doors
In the chapter "Fall and Winter 1988" Jeff gives me a gift of VW floor mats to encourage my dream of getting the bus I imagined. In 1989 I bought what would be my first car, a blue automatic Volkswagen bus that broke down on me at the ocean, on the freeway, everywhere. Didn’t matter. This song was on my lips a lot. I wanted to ride the snake. I knew the west was the best. "The blue bus is calling us," I called out creepily to my friends.

"Don’t Stand So Close to Me" by The Police (original 1983 recording)
Though it was the 1986 version that really brought Nabokov into my consciousness as I describe in the chapter "December 1986," to this day I prefer the original recording. It has everything: bus stops, a "young teacher," a "teacher’s pet" "half his age." To this day the song will start playing on the radio I call my oracle and the opening percussion still has the power to make me pause. Too bad that in reality there were no strong words in the staffroom.


Wendy C. Ortiz and Excavation links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Jordan Jeffers interview with the author
Los Angeles Times profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Book Notes - Vanessa Manko "The Invention of Exile"

The Invention of Exile

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Vanessa Manko's novel The Invention of Exile is epic in scope and brilliant in execution, a profound and remarkable debut.

The Boston Globe wrote of the book:

"Rich in history and far-reaching in scope, The Invention of Exile is an achingly painful and all too relevant meditation on what can happen to identity when human beings are crammed inside an unforgiving container of politics, bureaucracy, and fear."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Vanessa Manko's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel The Invention of Exile:


The Invention of Exile follows the fate of Austin Voronkov, a Russian immigrant who is accused of anarchy and deported from the U.S. during the first wave of the Red Scare. After returning to Russia with his American bride Julia, Austin has to flee once again, eventually ending up in Mexico where he and Julia, with young children now in tow, struggle to enter the U.S. as a unified family. When only Julia and the children are allowed to return, Austin is left living in exile in Mexico City and the novel recounts his efforts to reunite with his family. As such, it is a story filled with a sense of longing and so some of the songs here convey the mood of nostalgia and melancholy that I was attempting to depict throughout the book, particularly in passages focusing on Austin or Julia's memories of each other and all their travels together. While set in 1948 Mexico City, the book moves back and forth in time and place—from the U.S. in the 1920s during the height of the Red Scare, to Russia during the Civil War and finally to Mexico in the 1930s and 40s. I've chosen music that is representative of each section of the book. Mexican ranchera and danzón music, for instance, are part of Austin's days in Mexico City where he cobbles together an existence as a repairman hoping that his inventions will bring him to the U.S. Here, he befriends Anarose, a Mexican woman who offers him a glimmer of hope and love and this music underscores their fragile, tentative relationship. The chants of the Russian Orthodox Church and Russian folk songs that include the balalaika were in mind when writing about Julia and Austin's return to Russia, and, in other sections of the book, they helped me connect Austin, a deeply Russian character, to his lost country and culture. Finally, some of the music here I listened to while writing and when working on the overall structure of the novel.

Stravinsky, The Rite of Spring
This revolutionary piece of music by the Russian composer caused a riot at its first performance in 1913, and it is a work that heralded modernity. It's filled with foreboding, pulsating passages conjuring the threat of sacrifice as the "chosen one" is selected and dances herself to death. The dissonance of the music prefigured the broken state of the modern world since the early-twentieth century would soon face both the Russian Revolution and WWI and its aftermath. Because the novel is set during this time period and because it's structure is fractured, juxtaposing time and place on the page, Stravinsky's use of dissonance was influential. Also, I had this piece in mind when writing the Russian section of the novel, in particular, the scenes when Julia and Austin return to the Village of Varvarovkva in the Ukraine. They stay here through the Russian spring and are living a relatively peaceful life until the Bolsheviks ransack their home and belongings and take Austin to the commissar. In these scenes, I wanted to depict a calm, tranquil countryside and village life, while lending a sense of foreboding throughout; this is something Stravinsky does to great effect in this work.

Bach, The Goldberg Variations
I've long loved The Goldberg Variations. These 30 pieces composed for piano are distinct, but as variations, they share motifs and themes and so offer a pleasing symmetry that I enjoy when writing or when on a walk. In general, they help me to imagine structure and to create a certain mood or tone for particular passages. In the case of this novel, they were particularly important when trying to keep the disparate sections of the book connected through leitmotifs.

Vincente Fernández, "Volver, Volver"
This Mexican ranchera song translates as "Going Back, Going Back." Fernández sings of lost, unrequited love and pleads for his love to return to him. I imagine Austin on his walks in Mexico City or in the various cantinas he frequents with these kinds of ranchera songs playing in the background, his mind on Julia and his children.

K.D. Lang, "Helpless"
I love this song's elegiac mood and its regard for memory, and the lyric: "And in my mind I still need a place to go, All my changes were there." For me, the song suggests Austin's preoccupation with the past and his predilection for reverie.

Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, "Bagdad Café, I'm Calling You "
The haunting, yearning voice of Lorraine Hunt evokes Julia's sense of longing when living separated from Austin. For me, it also represents how Julia, her memory, voice and presence, reigns over Austin's days living in exile in both the Sonoran copper mines and later in Mexico City.

Keren Ann, "Lay Your Head Down"
I discovered Keran Ann while writing the novel. This reflective and melancholy song captures the tone and feel of the peaceful, loving times Julia and Austin share, whether it's during their first days of courtship or while they are living in the lighthouse in Mazatlan.

U2, "Moment of Surrender"
I listened to this song while on long runs during writing breaks. It's complex and filled with paradox. Something about the searching, desperate quality of the voice here reminded me of Austin's attempts to rebuild his identity amidst his life of complete and utter alienation.

Danzón music
The danzón, a type of music and dance, was popular in the Mexico City dance halls of the 1930s and 40s. A kind of bolero originally from Cuba, the music includes horns and guitars or drums and the songs are passionate, bittersweet stories of love and loss. The dance itself is a classic box step and dancers perform half and full turns, pivots and side steps as they travel around the dance floor. It can be a slow, sensual dance that increases in pace as the music reaches a crescendo with dancers incorporating more and more turns and intricate variations on the box step. Austin and Anarose dance to this music during one of their scenes at the outdoor dance hall. Some classic danzón music includes Teléfono de Larga Distancia, Como Fué, Besame Mucho.

Russian Orthodox Church chants and hymns
The chants sung by the choirs of the Russian Orthodox Church, sonorous and repetitive, with deep bass voices full of gravitas and reverence, captures for me the essence of the Russian soul, which is characterized by hard work, a visceral connection to the land (both the actual soil and the country's sheer size) and a capacity for great suffering and great joy. "Selected Chants of the Russian Orthodox Church" by the Monks Choir of Kiev Pechersk Monastery is a particularly beautiful compilation.

Russian balalaika music
The lilting, gentle strumming of the balalaika, the Russian folk guitar, evokes pastoral scenes of a Russian village and makes me think of the idyllic farm life Julia and Austin had hoped to build in his home village of Varvarovka. Some classic Russian folk songs that incorporate the balalaika are Krassnyi Sarafan (The Red Sarafan), Poscholej (Have Mercy), Karobuschka (Little Basket).


Vanessa Manko and The Invention of Exile links:

the author's website

Bookreporter review
Boston Globe review
Independent review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review

Interview Magazine interview with the author
Omnivoracious interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (Making Ulysses a Video Game, The Best Live Albums of All Time, and more)

PopMatters profiled a filmmaker who wants to adapt James Joyce's novel Ulysses into a video game.


Paste listed the best live albums of all time.


NPR Music is streaming the new J Mascis album Tied to a Star.


Lumina interviewed author David Connerly Nahm.


Pitchfork listed the best 200 tracks of the decade (2010-2014) so far.


The Observer interviewed author David Bezmogis on writing about the Ukraine.


NPR Music is streaming the new Ty Segall album Manipulator.


Entropy listed the best novels of 2014 (so far).


Weekend Edition interviewed Jess Row about his debut novel Your Face in Mine.


Flavorwire listed the greatest concert movies of all time.


Weekend Edition interviewed Rene Steinke about her new novel Friendswood.


The New York Times interviewed singer-songwriter Ryan Adams.


The Atlantic examined the allure of Haruki Murakami's novels.


Hype Machine is streaming the new Wand album, Ganglion Reef.


Short story writers discussed why they wrote a novel at BuzzFeed.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (A Shoreline Dream, The Dollyrots, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Casii Stephan: "Yo Yo" [mp3]

The Dollyrots: "Da Doo Ron Ron/I Wanna Be Sedated" [mp3]
The Dollyrots: "There's a Barbarian in the Back of My Car" [mp3]

Felix Champion: "Canyons" [mp3] from This Lateral Life (out November 24th)

Moro and the Silent Revolution: "Blamelessness" [mp3]

Random Parade: Random Parade Sampler EP [mp3]

A Shoreline Dream: "The Heart Never Recovered" [mp3] from The Silent Surprise (out September 9th)

Steve Dawson: An Introduction to Steve Dawson album [mp3]

The Whiskey Switch: The Whiskey Switch album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Matteah Baim: Live on WFMU's Airborne Event with Dan Bodah: Aug 4, 2014 [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

August 17, 2014

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - August 17, 2014

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Bruce Holbert for his novel The Hour of Lead
David Connerley Nahm for his novel Ancient Oceans of Central Kentucky
Eleni Sikelianos for her memoir You Animal Machine (The Golden Greek)
Laura Ellen Joyce for her novella The Luminol Reels
Rene Steinke for her novel Friendswood
Various authors for the anthology Astoria to Zion: Twenty-Six Stories of Risk and Abandon from Ecotone's First Decade
William Todd Seabrook for his novel The Imagination of Lewis Carroll


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily music and news posts:

Daily Downloads (10 free and legal mp3 downloads every day, plus links to free live recordings online)
Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Contests / Giveaways
Cover Song Collections
Daily Downloads
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
Try It Before You Buy It
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

August 16, 2014

Daily Downloads (The Week's Best Free and Legal Music Downloads, Including Delta Spirit, The Orwells, The Wytches, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

The Britanys: "Blow" [mp3] from It's Alright EP (out September 9th)

Delta Spirit: Lost and Found album [mp3]

The Dollyrots: "Punk Rock Girls (Queers cover)" [mp3]

The Harvey Girls: Live in a Basement EP [mp3]

Like Swimming: Like Swimming Album Preview EP [mp3]

Lilah Rose: "To Feel" [mp3]

The Orwells: Live from Dingwalls EP [mp3]

Robyn Cage: Raining Sideways EP [mp3]

The Wytches: Gravedweller EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Matteah Baim: Live on WFMU's Airborne Event with Dan Bodah: Aug 4, 2014 [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

August 15, 2014

Book Notes - Laura Ellen Joyce "The Luminol Reels"

The Luminol Reels

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

With short chapters that acutely leverage the power of flash fiction and prose poetry, Laura Ellen Joyce's novella The Luminol Reels is one of the year's most powerful books, one that imprints itself on your consciousness.

Brian Evenson wrote of the book:

"A fierce and deadly little fantasia that bites its way deep into your brain."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Laura Ellen Joyce's Book Notes music playlist for her novella The Luminol Reels:


Sonny Sharrock: "Portrait of Linda in Three Colors, All Black

If breathing ceases or aneurysm bursts, add filters to the screaming—beige, mustard, or celeriac tones can be used on the synesthesiac.

Fuck Buttons: "Brainfreeze"

Bad moon songs rise all night and you will burst grand mal through the sparkle, flat-lining before dawn.

Wolf Eyes: "Cellar"

There is a suitcase beside the bed, limbs neatly packed inside. A red rope hangs above you, made of fingernails and hair, the knife swinging close. Your thorax is closed, puckered with scars from your blood weddings.

Runhild Gammelsæter: "Collapse - Lifting the Veil"

Her fall is heavily accented with extra-diegetic sounds: a breach birth, a violin concerto written by a fascist, mouth fucking and dilated pupils are recorded in layers.

Sunn 0))): "DECAY2 [NIHILS' MAW]"

The effect is of a hostile sun; a bloody light looms from inside.

Demdike Stare: "Forest of Evil"

The last scene is cut, the girl is pulled down from the piñon tree, her silver shoes falling through the air.

Broadcast: "Found Scalded, Found Drowned"

His eyes were blue from the acid. It scalded the jelly down to nothing, exposed the now faulty veins and nerves.

Tanya Tagaq: "Hunger"

You slash her open and taste her. When she is in pieces, you hang her to cure. When she is nothing but bone and pearl, you set her on flat paddles in the oven. The parcels of smoked meat are the best you’ve ever tasted.

Lou Reed: "Metal Machine Music, Part II"

This reel is a compilation of all the gassings. The oven is wiped clean, silver. Stop motion poisons leak from it.

Basic House: "Nurse"

This can be applied to imprisoned, hospitalized, or housebound women. This reel is on a soft loop—each time it will fade until coma is achieved.

Bikini Kill: "Sugar"

As she put her tiny hand in his, red diesel stained his palm. He brought her a candy floss, it frothed around her face, sugar crystals caught between milk teeth as he put his hands around her neck.

Carla Bozulich: "Pissing"

He will want you to stop. His legs shake when he smells you coming close. His sweat smells of vinegar. You will let him be daddy, guiding him gently at first, then, whoring him down in your black furze.

Hole: "Pretty On The Inside"

We went to the swimming hole. We made a daisy chain that stretched around the body of the blue virgin three times. We machined the flowers into a holy reel.

PJ Harvey: "Rid of Me" (4-Track Demo Version)

When he comes to meet you, he crawls through the tunnel, his knees smeared with fishguts.

My Bloody Valentine: "Soft As Snow (But Warm Inside)"

Your dresses will breathe into your ears, their wrinkles hushed like velvet.

Pharmakon: "Sour Sap" (Bonus Track)

Now she is trapped in glass and dances in the projector. There is a shrine for her in the virgin’s grotto. Pinecones spray-painted silver are left beside it to make the nights festive.

Diamanda Galas: "The Litanies of Satan"

The bloody transparencies they pull from their abdomens will cushion her great fall, her shattering delayed.

Oxbow: "The Stabbing Hand" (Feat. Kathy Acker)

If you experiment sexually with knife play, be careful to use rubbing alcohol on the wounds to prevent interstitial pregnancies.


Laura Ellen Joyce and The Luminol Reels links:

video trailer for the book
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

VICE review

Collagist interview in excerpts with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


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Book Notes - Various Authors "Astoria to Zion: Twenty-Six Stories of Risk and Abandon from Ecotone's First Decade"

Astoria to Zion

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Ecotone has long been a vital literary journal, a point further impressed by tAstoria to Zion: Twenty-Six Stories of Risk and Abandon from Ecotone's First Decade, a book that celebrates its first 10 years. The stories in this anthology follow the Ecotone credo of "reimagining place," and include gems by Lauren Groff, Ron Rash, Kevin Brockmeier, Edith Pearlman, and others.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"The breadth of the selected tales creates a satisfying and often enthralling collection that perfectly celebrates Ecotone's first decade."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In their own words, here is the collaborative Book Notes music playlist for the anthology Astoria to Zion: Twenty-Six Stories of Risk and Abandon from Ecotone's First Decade:


Ron Rash, "Burning Bright"
"Wild Horses" by Gary Stewart

"Wild Horses" is a song Marcie would definitely respond to, though it would be the version done by Gary Stewart instead of the The Rolling Stones original. Stewart, using only an acoustic guitar and his high voice, takes the song to another level of pathos.


Steve Almond, "Hagar's Sons"
"Lonely Planet," from the album Dusk, by The The

This is some kind of a strange stoner Mersey gospel song. It has nothing to do with anxious Jewish monetary researchers or mysterious sheiks or 9/11. But it kind of captures the exalted mood that prevails in the story, the sense that destiny beckons to some of us and, with the least ascent, sucks us through time and space into our own loneliness. The refrain ("If you can't change the world, change yourself") lands on our hero, Cohen, pretty squarely. 


Kevin Brockmeier, "The Year of Silence"

"3:47 Silence to Facilitate Programming" from the 1987 cassette release of The Dreaming by Kate Bush

"The Year of Silence" describes what happens when a city succumbs to a mania of noiselessness. The world it proposes might be thought of as the inverse of the modern condition as Aldous Huxley described it: "The twentieth century is, among other things, the Age of Noise. Physical noise, mental noise, and noise of desire—we hold history's record for all of them. And no wonder; for all the resources of our almost miraculous technology have been thrown into the current assault against silence." What would happen, the story asks, if we employed all our technologies to eradicate sound? Who would we become, and would we better for it?



Rebecca Makkai, "The Way You Hold Your Knife"
"They Can't Take That Away From Me" by Billie Holliday

My story's title comes from the Billie Holliday version of "They Can't Take That Away From Me," and I can't imagine choosing anything else.


George Makana Clark, "The Wreckers"

"Bully in the Alley" by Three Pruned Men

While writing "The Wreckers," I struggled with Roland's voice. There are no audio recordings from the early nineteenth century, and letters from this period struck me as too mannered to accurately represent a soldier's rough speech. Instead, I relied on traditional barracks and sea songs. "Bully in the Alley" by Three Pruned Men best captures the boisterous, freewheeling language that I was going for in the story.


Benjamin Percy, "The Tree"
"Every Breath you Take" by The Police

One of the creepier love songs ever written. It's about more than longing—it's about romantic obsession, a dangerous sense of ownership—and that's the vibe that informs my story about a tree that falls in love with a girl and views her growing up as a betrayal.

Brad Watson, "Alamo Plaza"
"Biloxi" by Ted Hawkins

Ted Hawkins's raw vocals and longing memories of this place are perfect for this story set just between Gulfport and Biloxi, on the Mississippi coast, back in the '60s.


Brock Clarke, "Our Pointy Boots"
"Shoe Money" by Ass Ponys

I was living in Cincinnati, Ohio, when I wrote this story, and one of the greatest Cincinnati bands, one of my favorite bands, period, was the late, great, Ass Ponys. And one of my favorite songs by them, a song I listened to a lot during the time when I wrote this story, is "Shoe Money," off their album The Known Universe, in which funny things happen—someone misspells Satan's name, Satin, while defacing a graveyard—and yet the narrator keeps insisting that things aren't funny at all, and he says this, sings this, with such sad desperation that you're not sure how you're supposed to feel about what's going on in the song—funny or tragic?—which is exactly what I want the reader to feel while reading my "Our Pointy Boots."


Miha Mazzini, "That Winter"

"The Sloth" by Fairport Convention


A song I fell in love with when I was a kid. When I was preparing to write "That Winter," I found myself browsing old LPs until I put this one on the gramophone. It's about the starting of the war, while my story is about ending it. The first is much easier to do, of course.


Daniel Orozco, "Only Connect"
"In My Time of Dying" by Led Zeppelin

In my story, two drug dealers—Costas and a younger man referred to as "the boy"—drive to Astoria, Oregon, listening to an unspecified Led Zeppelin CD, the boy "slapping John Bonham's drum work on the dashboard and screaming the lyrics out the open window into the rushing night." The CD is Physical Graffiti, and the song they are listening to is "In My Time of Dying," which seems kind of emblematic of the boy's self-destructive live-fast-die-young behavior, though that was not my intent in picking it. I picked it because I wanted him to be banging on the dashboard to something, and what could be more dashboard-bangable than Led Zeppelin? And which of their songs could be more magnificent drumming-wise that "In My Time of Dying"?


Douglas Watson, "New Animal"
"That Don't Make It Junk" by Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen's 2001 album Ten New Songs was a frequent companion of mine around the time I wrote "New Animal." It helped me feel close to my mom, who had died the year before. It wasn't just that she had loved Leonard Cohen and that album in particular. It was that the album was right there where I was, in the same kind of mood. "That Don't Make It Junk" isn't necessarily my favorite song from the album, but it does, more than any other song I know, meet darkness and futility with a wink and a shrug—an attitude my mother would have approved of.


Maggie Shipstead, "Something Like the Resurrection"
"For the Widows in Paradise, For the Fatherless in Ypsilanti" by Sufjan Stevens

This song is off Stevens's Michigan album, which seems appropriate since "Something Like the Resurrection" is set in a house on the shore of Lake Michigan not far from Petoskey, where Stevens grew up. My grandparents retired in the area, and my extended family still convenes there sometimes in the summers—it's a beautiful part of the country. My story's central character, Agnes, is a widow who has summoned her children to her in anticipation of her death, and the song's final repetitions of the line "I did everything for you" managed to sound both nagging and resigned, much like Agnes herself.  


Shawn Vestal, "Winter Elders"
"Blank Maps" by Cold Specks

I love Cold Specks, for the beauty of Al Spx's husky, powerful voice and for her brilliant, poetic coupling of the sacred and the profane, as in the potent chorus of this song: "I am I am, I am I am a goddamn believer."


Bill Roorbach, "Broadax, Inc."
"Moanin'" by Charles Mingus

"Moanin'" is a wild ride, from the lowest bari sax notes you'll ever hear to a big band funk-bop cacophony, and back again. In terms of "Broadax, Inc.," I see this song in all its layers of complication as the workings of Broadax's mind, which is why I pick it now. But I listen to this song whenever I want to get pumped and energized, truly inspired. Even sitting at my desk, these notes give me the feeling of falling out of an airplane into a maelstrom. I laugh when I hear it—I laugh every time. It's playing right now because I had to look up the link for this post. I'm laughing. The other thing is that Mingus's "Moanin'" is a massively thoroughgoing arrangement and cover of the old Art Blakey standard. It's really fun, almost archeology, to go in and find the ruins of the old edifice under the new, spectacular.


Cary Holladay, "Horse People"
"Soldier's Joy" by Nitty-Gritty Dirt Band

There are many variations of this rousing old English tune, which traveled to the Southern mountains. The characters in "Horse People" would have heard it played on banjoes and fiddles at country dances. Nelle Fenton might think it was too backwoodsy, but her husband, Richard, would love it. A staid miller and county judge, he had a lighthearted side. I think he could persuade Nelle to join him for a reel when "Soldier's Joy" got to playing.


David Means, "The Junction"
"Cold Irons Bound" by Bob Dylan

A chugging railroad beat with a lonely soul singing a lament in the center, static, unmoving, twenty miles outside of town. The future is gone and the past is long past. The only stories left are the stories you tell yourself. I don't think this song directly inspired me to write my story, but it seems—at least to me right now, in retrospect—that it did. 



Lauren Groff, "Abundance"

"Nocturne Number 3" by Frédéric François Chopin

I'm an obsessive, and was listening to this one CD of Chopin's Nocturnes on repeat for a month. Why? No idea. I have the piano skill of a toddler with chopsticks for fingers, but I'm good at closing my eyes and imagining ability where there is none. I was aiming for the tempo of this particular Nocturne in "Abundance."




Ben Stroud, "The Traitor of Zion"
"Sleeping Bear, Sault Saint Marie" by Sufjan Stevens

This song always makes me think of the part of Michigan where "The Traitor of Zion" is set—Sleeping Bear Dunes is very close to Beaver Island (Sault St. Marie is much farther away).


Astoria to Zion: Twenty-Six Stories of Risk and Abandon from Ecotone's First Decade links:

the book's website

Ecotone Journal website

Atlanta Journal Constitution review
Harvard Review review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


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Shorties (Haruki Murakami Bingo, Michael Cera on His New Album, and more)

Electric Literature shared a new "Haruki Murakami Bingo" card.


Stereogum interviewed Michael Cera about his new folk album.


VCU News interviewed author Dave Eggers.


The Guardian asks, "Have you fallen out of love with music magazines?"


The Daily Beast and New York Times reviewed the new Haruki Murakami novel Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.


Basement Jaxx discussed house music's comeback with Flavorwire.


PopMatters shared an excerpt from the book Producing Country: The Inside Story of the Great Recordings by Michael Jarrett.


Canadian band The Barr Brothers discussed their gear at Drowned in Sound.


J.D. Salinger's New Hampshire home is for sale.


Paste listed the best Death Cab for Cutie songs.


The Paris Review shared an excerpt from Peter Mendelsund's new book What We See When We Read.


Rolling Stone listed obscure but awesome Willie Nelson tracks.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


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