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September 16, 2014

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - September 16, 2014

Shellac

Shellac released its first new album in seven years, Dude Incredible, is released today.

The Alla-Lah's' Worship the Sun is my personal favorite this week, but I have also enjoyed My Brightest Diamond's This Is My Hand and This Will Destroy You's Another Language.

Reissues include vinyl editions of three Metallica albums and two Jimi Hendrix releases.

What new releases are you picking up this week? What can you recommend? Have I left anything noteworthy off the list?


This week's interesting music releases:

The Alla-Lah's: Worship the Sun
alt-J: This Is All Yours
Cannibal Corpse: Skeletal Domain
Cocteau Twins: Heaven or Las Vegas (reissue) [vinyl]
The Front Bottoms: Rose [vinyl]
Jimi Hendrix: The Cry of Love (remastered)
Jimi Hendrix: Rainbow Bridge (remastered)
Lia Ices: Ices
Metallica: ...and Justice For All (reissue) [vinyl]
Metallica: Kill 'em All (reissue) [vinyl]
Metallica: Ride the Lightning (reissue) [vinyl]
Mike Doughty: Stellar Town
My Brightest Diamond: This Is My Hand
Myrkur: Myrkur
Phish: Nectar (reissue) [vinyl]
Shellac: Dude Incredible
This Will Destroy You: Another Language
Train: Bulletproof Picasso
Various Artists: Dead Man's Town: A Tribute To Born in the USA


also at Largehearted Boy:

weekly music release lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)





September 16, 2014

Atomic Books Comics Preview - September 16, 2014

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics and graphic novels.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. The Mobtown Shank is his blog, and his comic Said What? is syndicated weekly in the Baltimore Sun's B-Paper.

Atomic Books has been named one of Bizarre Magazine's 51 geekiest places on the planet, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


All-Star Future Shocks

All-Star Future Shocks
by by 2000 AD

This anthology collects a number of stand-alone stories from the long-running British anthology comics magazine, 2000 AD, and the line-up of writers and artists who have stories in here are a testament to the greatness of it. With Neil Gaiman, Grant Morrison, Mark Millar, Peter Milligan, Simon Spurrier, Kevin O'Neill, Brian Bolland, Glenn Fabry, Steve Dillion, Frazier Irving, and many more. The result is an excellent collection of comics sci-fi stories.


Cringe: An Anthology Of Embarrassment

Cringe: An Anthology Of Embarrassment
by Peter S. Conrad

This anthology allows us to share the humiliations of a number of other cartoonists. A good variety of styles and approaches to the stories delivers cringe after cringe: people wetting the bed with new lovers, lightbulb eating, inappropriate darkroom touching, awkward moments with fans, super-nerds harassing famous film directors and more. With stories by Gabby Schulz, J.T. Yost, Sam Spina, Liz Lunney, Jeffrey Brown, Elijah Brubaker, Box Brown, Steve Lafler, Jamie Vayda, Julia Gfrorer, Sam Henderson, Victor Kerlow, Noah Van Sciver and many more, there is an abundance of cringe-worthy moments here.


Shoplifter

Shoplifter
by Michael Cho

Cho's Corrina Park is a modern take on the classic archetype. She's the writer who takes a job with an ad agency to pay the rent, still believing she'll someday return to the live of a writer. Years later she's still there and still single. But while she's unhappy professionally, she's also quite comfortable. She's stuck. And so she turns to shoplifting to add some spice to her life. But behind delivering a familiar story-type, Cho lavishes the reader with gorgeous art and astute and subtle cultural observations in our use of technology.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2013" Book Lists

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (An Excerpt from James Ellroy's New Book, The Demise of the Fade-Out, and more)

NPR Books shared an excerpt from James Ellroy's new novel Perfidia.


Slate examined the demise of the fade-out in popular music.


Stereogum ranked XTC albums from worst to best.


The A.V. Club and Electric Literature interviewed John Darnielle about his new novel Wolf in White Van.

Read an excerpt from the book.


The musical duo Luluc played a Tiny Desk Concert.


Turntable Kitchen recommended new indie bands for your fall mixtape.


Tor.com interviewed author Emily St. John Mandel.


Stream the new Alt-J album This Is All Yours at Spotify.


The Rumpus interviewed author Will Chancellor.


The Quietus reexamined Depeche Mode's Some Great Reward album 30 years after its release.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (Spoon, Minnie Driver, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Anabot: "Everything Okay" [mp3] from Kiss Like A Knife EP (out December 2nd)

At the Close of Every Day: Monsters album [mp3]

David McMillin: "These Days (Jackson Browne cover)" [mp3]

Emily Wolf: Your Move album [mp3]

Minnie Driver: The Minnie Driver Collection EP [mp3]

Nights: "Last Night" [mp3] from Shallow

Ronnie Fauss: NoiseTrade Sampler EP [mp3]

The Shakes and Rumbles: The Shakes and Rumbles: Act 1 EP [mp3]

Shaky Knees: 7 Years Album Sampler EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Spoon: 2014-09-05, Raleigh [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

September 15, 2014

Book Notes - Luke B. Goebel "Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours"

Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Luke Goebel's Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours is a masterfully told debut novel of love and loss.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"If Kerouac were writing today, his work might look something like this—and despite the title, many of the stories are indeed ours, as they focus on love and loss, pain and yearning."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Luke B. Goebel's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours:


Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours has been called a "proud standing mess, like a Faulkner mess" by Padgett Powell. I would guess this refers both to the proud mess-ness of the narrator as well as to the nature of the form of this book. A collection of stories, often with a common narrator (the rest allegorical to the main narrative), was ordered and woven and spoken through by the speaker to create a part road story, part fictionalized memoir, part roaming storytelling reflection on America and the world-life. It is a novel of love and loss bound to the landscape, the times, and to an attention to speaking and story-telling and language experimentation. It is a music of the intrepid expansive self and the road and adventure and destruction and remaking of self and story.

In order to write this book, each story had to be crafted as both a story on its own and as pieces of a much larger cobbled and interwoven landscape or novel-shaped narrative. To explore what the book is doing, I'm creating a playlist of songs, one for each story in the book, and so each song will be related to not only the story as its own discrete unit (Ha! Or not discrete but wild and wily and perhaps overly-revealing), but to how each story plays into the larger whole of this improbable book as well.

1) Insides: Story One: Buffy Sainte-Marie God is Alive Magic is Afoot

This song strikes me as a match because it is so psychedelic and strange, so involved in the archetypal, and universal—also threatening, terrifying, overpowering. This is how the narrative begins in the book. If you look up the song to listen, you will likely see images of huichol art. Peyote art. Our narrator has done a bit too much. The first story in this collection is the invocation of a self, the invocation of the world, the invocation of the pasts and stories and literature and art and the human heart. But this self is terrified, is alive, is in the hospital, is agonizing in love lost, is trying to get some sort of understanding on himself and life and the forms of living and his place among the world of people and powers before it’s all over. And here’s an opening. Our speaker gets that he’s living in the midst of the universal, the archetypal, the game of living blindly. He is both direly serious and aware of the cosmic joke. He is both bound to himself and boundlessly exploring being-ness. He is the archetypal fool and the magician, bound to lose bound to win.

2) The Adventures of Eagle Feather: The Beatles Helter Skelter

I have no idea. The wild guitar screaming. The chorus shouting. The shaking earth. The eagles coming down. The unknown. How it’s all reframing. How you have your eye on one thing and the other thing departs. How you don’t know shit. How the elements are hot. How the summer comes. How the eagle feather stands up from the earth. How you just want to tear open the earth and take it all back. The one(s) you lost. How wild. How wild. How wild. I wish I could make something that wild, birth heavy metal, scream out like that. But then, you know, you get Charles Manson.

3) Drunk and Naked as He Was: Roy Orbison In Dreams

This is a setting builder, a shift of landscape and location and region and tone. It’s a cowboy song of heartbreak, out in the Texas night—on a hundred-acre steer ranch, the first night with a new puppy alone in the new land. It’s a move from New York City to rural Texas. And most of all, it’s about soon having your heart broken open and not knowing you’re about to have your heart broken. It’s that calm cool of dancing with a puppy to Roy Orbison in the naked Texas night—it’s knowing somehow everything that’s coming before it arrives, and dancing anyhow.

4) Boot of the Boot: Grateful Dead Friend of the Devil

This story is about losing the love for good. It’s come. There’s getting robbed. There’s a woman who keeps losing her tooth in her white pasta and sticking it back in her mouth and gumline. There’s a million stories woven into one lesson. It’s also a story that starts with the line, “If I ever meet a man named Manuelo from Paris, he better watch his fucking head.” It’s been dirty for dirty for so long, that one can’t help but invoke this joker card. And the stories keep coming in this story, adding up, dog-piling, intersecting, just dirty for dirty, until the beauty comes, and the joker fades back into the milieu.

5) Before Carl Left: Pink Floyd How I Wish You Were Here

This was the first song my brother Carl ever learned on the guitar. I can still see him on that first bed he ever had, sitting up, playing a huge guitar far too big for him, making the impossibility of music possible. This is the story where he dies and heartbreak really comes to the Earth for our narrator and for the writer.

6) Tough Beauty: Katherine Lee Bates America The Beautiful

This story is literally talking to Katherine Lee Bates, as well as to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as to peyote and San Francisco and the whole American trip. Unfortunately, it’s being told by a fellow named H. Roc, who is, let’s just say, TROUBLED. Also, it’s being interrupted by the narrator, who is telling his own troubled stories of American lunatic loss and Carl. Bah Bah Bah Bah! America, America, God shed his grace on thee.

7) Apache: Townes Van Zandt Dead Flowers

We got a horse story, Folks. Racing desert horses. The old teacher in disguise as a probably faux Apache. Out in the Southwest. Before it all goes, there’s the time when you just have to prove your guts against a lunatic you can’t beat. You have to beat him. Then it’s all this sort of feeling (the feeling of this song, best known from the Rolling Stones but always a Townes song) afterwards. And you wish only you could go back to the races. But those RACES. Goddamn. And that APACHE.

8) Hogs: Joni Mitchell Michael From Mountains

This is a song you don’t want to admit you know. Your mom played it. It really bums you out. It’s so embarrassing. You want to get away from admitting you know this song. You want to pretend you aren’t this person, like in photos of yourself at puberty. You want to die from humiliation from yourself. But you live. It’s your mom.

9) Out There: Bob Dylan Jokerman

We are in the RV on the coast in San Francisco, which isn’t San Francisco anymore. Freedom is just out of reach. We have traveled up from L.A. where we crashed into cars, drove with a loaded colt .45, made love in the big rig, got lost, shed layers of skin, were born with snakes in both fists, danced to the nightingale tune, saw the sea, and we are ready to go FURTHER. Jokerman is fucking with the stories and the archetypes, suffering from having enough power to run the ships. Losing it. Getting it back. Being better off if we didn’t have two jokers in a hand of five-card poker (assuming the jokers aren’t wild, which they may very well be.)

10) The Minds of Boys: Tom Waits I Don’t Wanna Grow Up

Kids on the beach, right by where the RV was parked last story. Kids living with a wild man named Keiko. Dogs. Elements. Childhood. Trouble. Fun. Never growing up.

11) Girls in Heat: Sinhala Version on Youtube Hotel California

In a hotel. Rain coming. No way forward. No way back. Haunted by what’s gone.

12) America, America, America: Johnny Cash God Bless Robert E. Lee

Not a great song, per se, but watch what I’m doing with it. Fighting with the International Gay Rodeo Association Grand Champion Squeaky at that ranch in Texas. Rat holes in the walls. Getting thrown out of the ranch. Dealing with loss. Fighting. Down in the South. Having no idea how to operate in the South. This song, regardless of its title, is about surrendering and saving lives. I’m glad Squeak and my narrator found peace out there in the Southern fields.

13) Chores: Alphaville (But also Jay Z) Forever Young

The lyrics are the point. This last story in the book is about washing a Ford truck, remembering, recapping the book, bringing the parts together, tying it up, staring at the sky, seeing visions, washing the truck, remembering it all. The narrator is not young, not forever, has lost it all, and is out still in Texas in the sun washing up the truck his brother left behind. There is plenty onward from that moment though, since the book works in strange time abilities, and throughout the book is fueled with stories that happen after this moment in the sun. Still, who doesn’t want to live forever? Not me is who doesn’t want this! I want to live forever. And I want my brother to live forever. And that’s partly why a book has been made. A large part. And for the America and for the world and for every reader, who I deeply thank and would love to hear from about their trip through the novel’s stories and the whole.

14) Surprise. There is no fourteenth story, but the stories added together make a whole fourteenth story. Talking Heads Burning Down The House

Pace, tone, aggression turned self-ward, 80’s enthusiasm and madness, want, need, self-ruination, lostness, craziness, tone, pitch, sound. Just going fuckwise with the self into burning through all you got for a home. GO!


Luke B. Goebel and Fourteen Stories, None of Them Are Yours links:

the author's website

Brooklyn Rail review
The Collagist review
Electric Literature review
Kirkus review
Online Sundries interview with the author
Southeast Review review

Route Nine interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Book Notes - Johnny Temple's Brooklyn Book Festival Playlist

Brooklyn Book Festival

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Johnny Temple is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Akashic Books and also bassist for the band Girls Against Boys.

This year's Brooklyn Book Festival will be held on September 21st, with Bookend events held all over the borough from September 15th through the 22nd.

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Johnny Temple's Book Notes music playlist for the Brooklyn Book Festival:


Although I am more publisher than bass guitar player these days, I was a musician long before I was a publisher or festival organizer. The following playlist is my own take on the backbeats of the annual Brooklyn Book Festival. The festival was launched in 2005 out of Brooklyn Borough Hall by our three-term borough president Marty Markowitz, who established the Brooklyn Literary Council and named me chair. Together with his staff, led by Carolyn Greer and Liz Koch, we built the council of volunteers to help program the festival. In this, our ninth year, the festival became its own nonprofit; we look forward to seeing everyone on September 21, with over 60 Bookend events taking place across the borough from September 15–22 (including A Spirited Celebration of Books and Music!).

People who have not yet been to the festival sometimes assume that it's primarily a celebration of Brooklyn authors. And while we have always had a strong representation of authors based here in town, this was never an exclusive focus. Every year the festival has become increasingly international, with authors traveling here from all over the world. This playlist is heavily Caribbean, which is a reflection of my own musical and literary tastes, along with some must-have Brooklyn artists and other songs that capture the spirit of the Brooklyn Book Festival.

"Redefinition" by Black Star. This hip-hop homage to Brooklyn paints a somewhat menacing portrait, and yet it still makes many of us proud to call this place home. "Brooklyn, New York City, where they paint murals of Biggie / In cash we trust, cause it's ghetto fabulous, life look pretty . . ." What's more, rapper Talib Kweli (one half of Black Star, with Mos Def) once ran an important book shop and community space, Nkiru Bookstore (RIP), here in Brooklyn. A powerful force in that endeavor was the rapper's mother, Dr. Brenda Greene, herself a Brooklyn Literary Council member from early on.

"Hot Hot Hot" by Arrow. Rain is a book festival's worst nightmare. So when I'm there at the festival in mid-September and someone complains, "Man, it's too damn hot out here," my mind goes to Monterrat singer Arrow: "My mind's on fire / My soul's on fire / Feeling hot hot hot . . ." Particularly under the threat of downpour, I agree with Arrow: heat can be a good thing.

"Mr. Consular" by Home T-4 and Yellowman. Our festival started out with an international focus and every year more authors have joined us from across the world. This year alone, authors from Brazil (Paulo Scott), India (Amit Chaudhrui), Cuba (Mylene Fernandez-Pintado), Israel (Assaf Gavron), Haiti (Frankétienne), South Africa (Lauren Buekes), England (Nadeem Aslam, Hamid Ismailov, and Nadifa Mohammed), France (Scholastique Mukasonga), and Mexico (Mario Bellatin), among other countries,will participate in our programming. With this breadth of authors, visa/border challenges occasionally arise, sometimes insurmountable. This song goes out to all those writers facing political and visa persecution. Only Yellowman can put soul into a consulate visit gone awry.

"Man Down" by Rihanna. This song brings a heavy, irresistible Caribbean vibe to the pop-song format. The Brooklyn Book Festival brings a heavy, irresistible Caribbean vibe to a literary format—with a host of authors of Carribean descent at this year, including Tiphanie Yanique, Marlon James, Frankétienne, Roxane Gay, Christopher John Farley, Tanya Batson-Savage, and Roland Watson-Grant, among others.

"S. Carter" by Jay-Z. Any Brooklyn resident making a playlist is required to include a Jay-Z track. This particular song suits my list well, both because of the reference to the most important TV personality in book publishing ("Hustler, nigga, move weight like Oprah") and the aggressive Brooklyn pride ("I'm from Bed-Stuy, killa with the flow / Let lead fly from out the four-four, motherfuckers . . .").

"The Don" by Peter Metro. This is a shout-out to the Calabash International Literary Festival in Treasure Beach, Jamaica, which has been a massive inspiration for me as both a festival organizer and a book publisher. Best-selling Jamaican author Colin Channer, one of the three Calabash architects (with Kwame Dawes and Justine Henzel), joined the Brooklyn Literary Council in our early days and helped us get the festival get off the ground, before he relocated from across the street from me in Fort Greene to points north.

"Give the People What They Want" by Jimmy Cliff. Speaking of great book festivals, this song lays out the basic ambition of all such endeavors. The Miami Book Fair International, the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, the Bocas Lit Fest in Trinidad, the Texas Book Festival, the Guadalajara Book Fair in Mexico—along with others across the world, every year these festivals serve up solid gold for book lovers of all ages and backgrounds.

"Roots, Rock, Reggae" by Bob Marley and the Wailers. According to my own moral code, I can't have a playlist and not include Bob Marley. In any event, book festivals are fundamentally upbeat and forward-thinking, so this song fits well.

"Royals" by Lorde. This lush and melancholic tune seems to run on the same steam as an Irwin Shaw or Thomas Wolfe short story set in 1930s Brooklyn—or a Jonathan Lethem (who will be at the Festival in conversation with Jules Feiffer) novel set in 1970s Brooklyn.

"Stay Positive" by The Hold Steady. Even New Brooklyn can be unabashedly optimistic, if only in fleeting doses.

"Minor Threat" by Minor Threat. This is a rejection of the apathy of adulthood, and along the way it also became an anthem for misfits (and others). Any large gathering of book lovers has an overrepresentation of misfits. Come to think of it, Brooklyn itself both generates and lures misfits. In some cultures the words for "artist" and "misfit" are interchangeable. Also, Minor Threat singer Ian MacKaye appeared in conversation with fellow underground musical hero Thurston Moore at the Brooklyn Book Festival in 2008.

"Welcome to Jamrock" by Damian Marley. One of the most badass songs of the past decade, this grim analysis of ghetto claustrophobia implicitly advocates for education and commitment to youth. "Come on let's face it, a ghetto education's basic / And most of the youths them waste it / And when them waste it, that's when them take the guns and replace it / Then them don't stand a chance at all . . ." Youth programming has always been vital to the Brooklyn Book Festival, along with our commitment to providing literary attractions for all ages, cultures, religions.

"Bam Bam" by Sister Nancy. What's not to love about a feminist Jamaican dancehall classic that little boys and old women alike will sing along to? It's a perfect closer for this massive global book celebration on September 21 in Brooklyn.


Brooklyn Book Festival links:

website
Twitter
Tumblr
Facebook

David Ulin on #BKBF
Publishers Weekly


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (Margaret Atwood Interviewed, Stream the New Leonard Cohen Album, and more)

All Things Considered interviewed Margaret Atwood about her new short story collection Stone Mattress.


NPR Music is streaming the new Leonard Cohen album, Popular Problems.


Actor Jason Segel discussed his favorite books at The Week.


PopMatters reconsidered Jeff Buckley's Grace album twenty years after its release.


NPR Music is streaming the new Sondre Lerche album Please.


Weekend Edition and the Greenville News and Record interviewed John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats about his new novel Wolf in White Van.


All Things Considered interviewed author James Ellroy.


Stereogum reconsidered the Arcade Fire's debut album Funeral ten years after its release.


The Guardian interviewed author Howard Jacobson.


The New York Times profiled Claire Boucher of Grimes.


Cheryl Strayed talked to the Denver Post about the film adaptation of her book Wild.


Drowned in Sound interviewed singer-songwriter Jenny Lewis.


The Telegraph shared an excerpt from Douglas Coupland’s new book Kitten Clone: Inside Alcatel-Lucent.


Paste listed the best Built to Spill songs.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (Wilco, The Necessary Gentlemen, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Aaron and the Burrs: Release the Bats single [mp3]

Blood and Glass: "Paper Heart" [mp3]

Daddy Lion: Perpetual Calendar EP [mp3]

Devereaux: "" [mp3] from Pineapple Flex

Mickey Theis: No Saints EP [mp3]

The Necessary Gentlemen: Fools to Stay album [mp3]

The Riverside: Gettin' Lost album [mp3]

Various Artists: Denovali Swingfest 2014 Essen (Sampler Album)

Will Dailey: Back Flipping Forward album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Wilco: 2014-09-06, Arrington [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

September 13, 2014

Daily Downloads (The Week's Best Free and Legal Music Including Justin Townes Earle, Grouper, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Branches: NoiseTrade Sampler EP [mp3]

Caroline Rose: I Will Not Be Afraid Sampler EP [mp3]

Foreign Fields: Little Lover EP [mp3]

Garrison Starr: The Forgotten Street EP [mp3]

Grouper: "Call Across Rooms" [mp3] from Ruins (out October 13th)

Justin Townes Earle: NoiseTrade Eastside Manor Session EP [mp3]

Lucius: Let's Get Noisey EP [mp3]

Various Artists: Living High On The Dirty Business Of Dreams - A Wiaiwya Sampler album [mp3]

Wes Kirkpatrick: Short Dream EP [mp3]

The Wild After: Lesson Learned EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

White Lung: 2014-09-06, Raleigh [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


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September 12, 2014

Book Notes - Laila Lalami "The Moor's Account"

Sherwood Nation

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Laila Lalami's ambitious and captivating The Moor's Account impresses with its authentic voice and illumination of the 16th century conquistadors interactions with the New World.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Estebanico’s account alternates between this disastrous mission and his past as a merchant, with the two threads combining to create a deeply layered, complex portrait of all-too-familiar characters in an unfamiliar world. The result is a totally engrossing and captivating novel that reconsiders the overlooked roles of Africans in New World exploration"

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Laila Lalami's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Moor's Account:


My third novel, The Moor's Account is based on the true story of the first African explorer of America, a Moroccan slave known as Estebanico. To write the book, I had to do a lot of research on Spanish conquest of America and, more specifically, on the failed Narváez expedition of 1527. I read dozens of sources on the political and cultural climate of sixteenth-century Morocco, Spain, and America. And I had to write about this often bloody history while maintaining the voice and point of view of a sixteenth-century Moroccan slave. Here are some of the pieces I listened to while writing the book:

"Symphony No. 4," Brahms
I started all my workdays with Brahms. Often, I would still be answering emails when "Symphony No. 4" began to play, but by the end of the first movement, I was ready to write. I can't explain how or why it inspired me so much, but it always did.

"Ech Edani," Souad Massi
The North African darbouka drum pairs well with the Spanish guitar. Add Souad Massi's mesmerizing voice and her beautiful lyrics and you have the perfect song for a book like The Moor's Account, where cross-cultural encounters are so central to the story.

"The Promised Land" – Bruce Springsteen
My commute to the University of California, where I teach fiction and nonfiction, is frighteningly long. To keep myself from losing my mind, I listen to Bruce Springsteen. I often use my time in the car to think about problems I have in a scene.

"Marikan" - Aza
I came across Aza's music at a concert in Los Angeles six or seven years ago, where they played Tamazight (Berber) music. They use both traditional instruments, like the guenbri, and modern instruments, like the electric bass. The fusion is particularly successful on this track.

"Killing in the Name Of" – Rage Against the Machine
I'm not generally a fan of angry rock, but the themes of this song make it a good fit for a novel about conquest. Every time RATM came up on the radio last year, my ten-year-old and I head-banged together.

Birth of the Cool – Miles Davis
When I was revising the novel, I used different tricks to force myself to look at the text with new eyes. For instance, I changed the font type and size or I went to sit in a different room in the house. I also listened to Birth of the Cool, which always gave me the energy to take on yet another draft.

"Cello Sonata No. 1" – Brahms
Another favorite is this cello sonata from Brahms. One of the challenges of writing this book was creating the voice of a sixteenth-century man, which had to feel authentic without being dated or stilted. To do that, I relied a lot on instrumental music, which is why my beloved Brahms was such a big part of my daily routine.


Laila Lalami and The Moor's Account links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

BookPage review
Kirkus review
Los Angeles Times review
The Millions review
New York Times review

All Things Considered interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Secret Son
The Nervous Breakdown self-interview by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


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Book Notes - Benjamin Parzybok "Sherwood Nation"

Sherwood Nation

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Benjamin Parzybok's new novel Sherwood Nation is a riveting and imaginative retelling of the Robin Hood myth set in a near-future dystopia.

Shelf Awareness wrote of the book:

"Sherwood Nation--Benjamin Parzybok's second novel, after Couch--is a fast-moving tale of ideas and action, lent credibility by current headlines and engaging characters. Parzybok's apocalyptic future is so realistic, readers may think twice before guzzling a big glass of ice water."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Benjamin Parzybok's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Sherwood Nation:


Sherwood Nation is about a woman who secedes a neighborhood and runs it as her own country, an enclave, during a period of extreme drought. Within, the city's mayor plays video games, a retiring drug dealer wishes he could read tea leaves, an ad exec digs a tunnel under his house, and a cafe barista becomes a revered hero. Sherwood Nation's playlist speaks to each of these, while, I hope, making a kick-ass mixtape. Enjoy!


"Fake Empire" - The National, from Boxer

The empire has fallen. Let's put a little something in our lemonade! (Probably that drought-ration moonshine.)

"Scared Money" - Saul Williams, from The Inevitable Rise and Fall of Niggy Tardust

A rallying call to the disenfranchised. This song is a masterpiece.

"Fuck the bullshit
Whether from the hill or from the pulpit
Today, I put my money
On the fall of every culprit"

"Bag of Hammers" - Thao, from We Brave Bee Stings and All

The image Thao paints here, of a woman standing on a lawn with a bag of hammers in her hand, on the verge of wreaking holy hell on the house in front of her, is perfect. Renee, aka Maid Marian, gathers her own army on the city's front lawn.

"Halo," by The Upsidedown, from Human Destination

A halo is a dangerous weapon. By my friends The Upsidedown. #portlandband

"Paris is Burning" - St Vincent, from Marry Me

A city that has not burned is a city full of tinder. In order to seed the new nation with some wealth, Josh and Jamal steal a city truck full of water rations. One of them won't make it back.

"Neighborhood #1 (Tunnels)" - Arcade Fire, from Funeral

The ad executive from the city's ad firm has lost his job. In his new free time, he obsessively builds a tunnel under his house for reasons he's not entirely clear.

"City of Refuge" - Abigail Washington

While the city around them falls apart, the small nation at its center, housing 20 to 30 thousand citizens, are getting their shit together. For now, it's a refuge.

"Dog Walkers of the New Age" - Breathe Owl Breathe

The surreality of this song mirrors how I imagine those first few days of the new nation, when you wake up unsure to what nation you belong, and what the implications of that are. A song of tentative, disorienting hope.

"The Roots Beneath Your House" - The Golden Bears, from Wall to Wall

This book could have taken place just about anywhere (it's playing out now in the cities like Rio de Janeiro and Detroit and Los Angeles!). But in the end I put it in Portland, where I live, and so I have the pleasure of calling out Portland bands. My friends The Golden Bears: "When the roots beneath your house come crowning through the floor… lay your body down… and trade your famined thoughts for leaves and vines instead." #portlandband

"Belly of the Cavern" - Typhoon - from Hunger and Thirst

Like this song, Nevel is on a quest, seeking in the earth for some meaning and escape. But instead his solitary quest brings him a new entrance back into the world. #portlandband

"Butter + Toast" - Reggie Watts - from Why S*** So Crazy?

Reggie sings about flapjacks with agave nectar. Also: the mirrors and the mirrors within & stores full of useless shit. Zach, the new nation's strategist, would put this on long repeat, as he wanders through the deep and shallow of country logistics and supplies. "Somebody want a napkin? Too bad, motherf***er, use your sleeve."

"Fables of Faubus" - Charles Mingus

Gregor is a late-sixties retired drug dealer, and the general of the new nation of Sherwood. A man who has weathered incredible storms in his life. At this point, to his growing surprise, he realizes he would do anything for this fledgling nation. Even go up against the National Guard, as this incredible political piece by Mingus speaks to.

"Shame" - Hungry Ghost

Hungry Ghost is another PDX power trio. Let's not beat around the bush: Just about everyone does the wrong thing at some point in her/his life. Major fuckups make major catalysts. Shame never sounded so good. #portlandband

"The New Country" - Marisa Anderson, from Mercury

Yes, we repeat the cycles of history. But revolutions leave the residue of lasting change. My friend Marisa Anderson's intricate, melancholy instrumental aptly finishes us off. #portlandband


Benjamin Parzybok and Sherwood Nation links:

the author's website
the author's Tumblr

Kirkus review

KBOO interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Couch
Late Night Library interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (James Franco on Adapting The Sound and the Fury, An Interview with Owen Pallett, and more)

USA Today shared an excerpt from James Franco's forthcoming book, Hollywood Dreaming: Stories, Pictures, and Poems.

Franco also talked to the Guardian about his film adaptation of Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury.


The Rumpus interviewed musician Owen Pallett.


Bookforum interviewed author Ben Lerner.


Stereogum reconsidered The Notorious BIG's album Ready To Die on its 20th anniversary.


The Guardian listed American novels that should have won the Booker Prize.


The Los Angeles Times mourned the Apple iPod.


Vulture interviewed author Joshua Ferris.


Flavorwire listed the greatest crush songs ever.


The Independent interviewed author David Mitchell.


The A.V. Club suggested entry points into the discography of Queen.


Emma Straub offered novel-writing advice at Rookie.


NPR Music is streaming a recent New Pornographers show.


The New Republic considered the legacy of John Updike's Rabbit novels.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

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