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July 22, 2014

Shorties (Folio Society Changes with the Times, A New Raveonettes Album, and more)

Publishing Perspectives examined how Folio Society is changing with the times.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Sune Rose Wagner about the new Raveonettes album, surprisingly released this week.


The Japan Times profiled Annie Clark of St. Vincent.


PopMatters listed the top 25 albums in Merge Records' history.


Author Porochista Khakpour shared her daily habits with Adult.


Will playlists replace the album?


Author Yannick Murphy interviewed herself at Publishers Weekly.


The A.V. Club listed the best albums of 2014 so far.


The Rumpus interviewed author Lucy M. Johnson.


Paste listed the most visually captivating music videos.


R.I.P., author Thomas Berger.


Hamilton Leithauser of the Walkmen played a solo Tiny Desk Concert.


The Guardian predicted books that will make the 2014 Man Booker Prize longlist.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)





July 22, 2014

Daily Downloads (Shovels and Rope, The Sunshine Fix, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

2:54: two tracks [mp3]

Casey Jack: "Not in Love with the Modern World" [mp3] from Casey Jack (out August 26th)
Casey Jack: "Stay Away" [mp3] from Casey Jack (out August 26th)

L'anarchiste: The Traveler album [mp3]

Populous: "Brasilia" [mp3] from Night Safari

Shovels and Rope: Swimmin' Time Primer EP [mp3]

The Teaspoons: free and legal The Teaspoons album [mp3]

Turning Plates: "Falling Lives" [mp3] from The Shouting Cave (out September 22nd)

Wednesday's Wolves: The Queen EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

The Sunshine Fix: 2003-09-20, Athens [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

July 21, 2014

Book Notes - Gustavo Faverón Patriau "The Antiquarian"

The Antiquarian

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Profound, poignant, dark, and complex, The Antiquarian is one of the year's finest novels.

The New York Times wrote of the book:

"Delightfully macabre. . . . A novel in which storytelling can prove redemptive, but it can also kill. . . . The Antiquarian is steeped in alienation, shame, mourning and disgust. It is intelligently conceived and well executed. Rather than serve up a tantalizing mystery with a tidy resolution, this book does the opposite, demolishing the 'facts' and assumptions amassed along the way. It has hundreds of intricate pieces. Once you finish reading, you may feel compelled to take it apart, figure out how it works and begin again."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Gustavo Faverón Patriau's Book Notes music playlist for his novel, The Antiquarian:


The story I tell in The Antiquarian takes place mostly in a city shaped like two intersecting spirals. At its center is a psychiatric hospital: a bleak atmosphere, a sad and rarified psych ward that seems as crazy as the people it houses, where patients, doctors, and ghosts are indistinguishable. When I was trying to visualize it in my mind, I often thought of German expressionist movies, and I started watching them again after many years. Of course, most are silent films. I wondered what would happen if I watched them while listening to old songs that had come to mind since I had started writing the novel, songs I felt were connected to my characters and the spaces they inhabited.

These are some of those songs:

Charlie Parker, "Lover Man"The Antiquarian is not a horror story, but a novel about madness and literature (one might confuse madness and horror because each produces the other, so when one is present the other is not too far). The best novella I've read about madness and its connection to the creative process is El perseguidor (The Pursuer) by the Argentinean master Julio Cortázar. Its protagonist, an American sax player named Johnny Carter, is a barely disguised Charlie Parker, whose most disturbing psychotic incident comes when he is recording a song called "Amorous." He starts perceiving time in a twofold manner: time in the world and time in the music, the latter growing and elongating inside the former, pushing its limits. Johnny Carter´s "Amorous" is Charlie Parker's "Lover Man." Parker recorded many versions, at least two of them legendary: one for Dial, and one for Verve with his own quintet. The second recording is perfect but the first one—the one Cortázar had in mind, although clearly flawed—is much better: a visionary going after something, with an instrument that is not enough for him. Both for Parker and for Carter the sessions concluded in panic attacks: fear of their own mental instability, of having gone too far. While writing The Antiquarian, I often listened to both versions as a reminder of the difference between good craft and great art, but also as a reminder of the proximity between madness and horror.

Unknown Peruvian musicians, "Pastora", "Negro de Lachaqui" – Andean violin music is the most awkwardly happy way of expressing melancholy that I have ever heard. It might have to do with the fact that violins arrived to the Andean region in the hands of conquistadors and murderous hacienda owners: the gift of new music from the hand that will very likely kill you. Part of The Antiquarian is set in a place evocative of the Peruvian highlands during a time of political violence. Although that aspect of the novel has not been brought up by American critics so far, the novel alludes to the war that the Shining Path—a Maoist guerrilla—launched against the Peruvian state in the 1980s. I felt naturally compelled to listen to Andean music and found two beautiful and intriguing songs, "Pastora" and "Negro de Lachaqui," both included in the seventh volume of the Smithsonian´s "Traditional Music of Peru." Listen to them here.

Paavoharju, "Italialaisella Laivalla" – Considering I am not a religious person and the members of Paavoharju are ascetic Christians, it just may be a good thing that I don´t understand a word they say. But "Italialaisella Laivalla" sounds like the saddest little melody even if you do not know what is going on. The emotion it produces, then, is purely atmospheric. I'm always seduced by art that has the capability of communicating at a level that is well beyond pure referentiality, beyond literal or metaphorical meaning, and even beyond suggestion: art that opens wounds in your body or in your mind and waits to see what comes from inside you.

Shugo Tokumaru, "Parachute" – The first time I heard Shugo Tokumaru's "Parachute" I knew there was too much happiness in the music itself for it to be true. So I looked for an English version of the original Japanese lyrics and found out I was right. The song is infused with beautifully pitch-black humor and it is almost perverse. It sounds, though, like a childlike tune. Perversity and childishness were the characteristics I was building in the personality of Sofia, one of the most darkly enjoyable characters of The Antiquarian. Tokumaru helped me with that almost as much as the next song, "The King of Carrot Flowers."

Neutral Milk Hotel, "The King of Carrot Flowers, Part 1" – A different take on childhood and perversity with a loving touch and suicidal tendencies, Jeff Mangum's song sounded to me like a conversation over coffee between two of my characters. Daniel and Sofia, the siblings, are often associated throughout the novel with childhood, but there are only two or three brief passages in which Sofia is still an actual child (Daniel is at least 18 years old in last of these episodes). The rest is a perverted prolongation of childhood into adulthood. The crimes themselves are aberrant reiterations of childhood games.

Tom Waits, "Alice" – I don't think I need to say a lot about this one and how it connects with the others. What's great about Tom Waits's song is that, somehow, Alice is the adult whereas the singer is the child longing for her. That is a nice way of vindicating the original Alice, robbed of her innocence by Lewis Carroll (remember the pictures?) and then forced to remain a child forever thanks to the book.

Daniel Johnston, "Devil's Town" – Ghost towns only exist is bad movies, great fictions, and postwar countries, and I am interested in all three. But what drew me towards Daniel Johnston was Jeff Feuerzeig's documentary on Johnston's bipolar disorder and satanic obsession, and the relation between that and his unending creativity. I don't remember exactly what the phrase is that my protagonist, Daniel (see the connection in the name?) says to the narrator of The Antiquarian, something like: "Mental illnesses make you speak, but they turn language into a ritual… I'm going to tell you lots of stories today." All that came from my own obsession with Daniel Johnston and songs like this one.


Gustavo Faverón Patriau and The Antiquarian links:

Bustle review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
Three Percent review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


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Book Notes - Jean Kwok "Mambo in Chinatown"

Mambo in Chinatown

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jean Kwok's second novel Mambo in Chinatown is an engrossing cross-cultural coming-of-age tale.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"In her winning second novel (after Girl in Translation, 2010), Kwok infuses her heartwarming story with both the sensuality of dance and the optimism of a young woman coming into her own."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Jean Kwok's Book Notes music playlist for her novel, Mambo in Chinatown:


Tracy Chapman, "Fast Car" and "Mountains O' Things"

I've always been a big Tracy Chapman fan, partly because she sings about the burdens of being working class with desperation and tenderness. My heroine Charlie is washing dishes in a noodle restaurant when we first meet her, and she dreams of being someone else, of having a better life. I hear Tracy Chapman's desire to escape in "Fast Car":

You got a fast car

I got a plan to get us out of here

I been working at the convenience store

Managed to save just a little bit of money
…
You and I can both get jobs

And finally see what it means to be living

And I also think of her lyrics from "Mountains O' Things":

The life I've always wanted

I guess I'll never have

I'll be working for somebody else
Until I'm in my grave

I'll be dreaming of a live of ease
And mountains, oh mountains o' things

Beyoncé, "If I Were a Boy"

I really love Beyoncé's wistful daydreaming about being a boy here, and both Charlie and I would have had an easier time if we'd been born male. Like Charlie, I was an anomaly in my traditional Chinese family: a girl bad at cooking and cleaning, clumsy and not feminine enough.


Ricky Martin, "Livin' La Vida Loca"

This Ricky Martin mambo always reminds me of the years I spent working as a professional ballroom dancer, both because I danced to many Ricky Martin songs in that time period and because this number is so passionate and wild. Indeed when Charlie lands a job at a ballroom dance studio, she finds herself suddenly living la vida loca, a crazy life.

Verdi, La Traviata, Giorgio Germont and Violetta duet

I find this to be such a moving duet, especially when sung by Angela Gheorghiu. Germont is the father of Violetta's lover, Alfredo, and Germant persuades Violetta to give Alfredo up because she is a courtesan and would destroy their family's reputation. It's an extraordinarily beautiful piece of music as the father reminds Violetta of her duty even though she is passionately in love with Alfredo. That struggle between duty and love is one that my heroine Charlie must wrestle with throughout my novel as she finds herself living in two worlds, that of working class Chinatown and the glamorous one of ballroom dance.

Billie Holiday, "God Bless the Child"

One thing that Charlie could never turn her back on is her love for her little sister, Lisa. That devotion in the midst of hard times is beautifully sung by Billie Holiday:


Yes, the strong gets more
While the weak ones fade
Empty pockets don't ever make the grade
Mama may have, Papa may have
But God bless the child that's got his own
That's got his own

Thelonious Monk, Round Midnight

As Charlie becomes a strong and graceful dancer, Lisa's health fails and Charlie becomes desperate to get Lisa a Western diagnosis despite their father's insistence on treating Lisa only with Eastern medicine. In the night scenes, when Charlie walks the streets of Chinatown in despair, I hear Ella Fitzgerald singing Thelonious Monk's Round Midnight, with Oscar Peterson on the piano:

Suppertime I'm feelin' sad;
But it really gets bad,
'round midnight.
Memories always start round midnight.

Tito Puente, "Take the A Train"

Meanwhile, Charlie is exploring new worlds both emotionally and physically, and she goes on a date to dance mambo in Spanish Harlem with her dance student Ryan. Of course, I think of Tito Puente as they take the subway uptown.

Miles Davis, "Baby, Won't You Make Up Your Mind"

But even when Ryan and Charlie begin to fall in love, Charlie can't forget that Ryan already has a girlfriend. As Ann Baxter sings together in a band with the great Miles Davis and Art Blakey:

I'm tired of playing this game

I've suffered just enough pain

Baby, won't you make up your mind

Aretha Franklin, "You Make Me Feel Like a Natural Woman"

By the end of the book, Charlie has found herself, as a dancer, a sister, a daughter and a woman. She feels understood and complete, as Arethra Franklin sings:

When my soul was in the lost and found

You came along, to claim it

I didn't know just what was wrong with me

'Til your kiss helped me name it


Jean Kwok and Mambo in Chinatown links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

BookPage review
Bookreporter review

ArtsATL interview with the author
Banana Writers interview with the author
Bustle interview with the author
Weekend Edition interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Shorties (Ranking Cormac McCarthy's Books, Stream the New Jenny Lewis Album, and more)

Flavorwire ranked Cormac McCarthy's books.


All Things Considered interviewed singer-songwriter Jenny Lewis.

NPR Music is streaming Lewis's new album, The Voyager.


At the New Republic, Andrew Ladd calls for "author's cuts" of books.


NPR Music is streaming Bear in Heaven's new album Time Is Over One Day Old.


The London Free Press profiled cartoonist Bryan Lee O'Malley.


Salon examined streaming music royalty rates' effects on jazz and classical musicians.


Weekend Edition interviewed Douglas Copeland about his new novel Worst. Person. Ever.


Pitchfork listed overlooked albums of 2014 so far.


Two winners of the Caine Prize for African Writing discussed the award at Tell Me More.


Flavorwire shared a career-spanning Morrissey playlist.


Author Dean Koontz listed his favorite books at The Week.


Sharon Van Etten visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Daily Downloads (Oneida, A Great River Folk Fest Compilation, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Autumn in June: "Weeks" [mp3] from Autumn in June (out September 116th)

The Bright Road: Norway album [mp3]

Chasing Phantoms: Like Sailing into a Storm EP [mp3]

Go Life: "I'm Not Really Here" [mp3]

Neil Holyoak: "Red Queen of Autumn" [mp3] from

New God: "Firework" [mp3] from

Sassparilla: "Cool Thing" [mp3]
Sassparilla: "What the Devil Don't Know" [mp3]

Various Artists: 2014 Great River Folk Fest Mix album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Oneida: 2014-17-02, Brooklyn [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

July 19, 2014

Daily Downloads (Josh Ritter, Kaki King, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Drive-By Truckers: 2011-10-28, St. Louis [mp3,ogg,flac]
Drive-By Truckers: "Uncle Frank" [mp3]

Hayes Carll: 2014-07-12, Winston-Salem [mp3,ogg,flac]
Hayes Carll: "Bad Liver and a Heart" [mp3]

Josh Ritter: [mp3,ogg.flac]
Josh Ritter: "Girl in the War" [mp3]

Kaki King: 2014-04-29, Washington [mp3,ogg,flac]
Kaki King: "Fortuna" [mp3]

Mother Hips: 2014-07-05, Quincy [mp3,ogg,flac]
Mother Hips: "Gold Plated" [mp3]

Robyn Hitchcock: 2014-05-23, Sydney [mp3.ogg.flac]
Robyn Hitchcock: "Nothing Was Delivered (Bob Dylan cover)" [mp3]

Sharon Van Etten: 2010-10-09, New York [mp3,ogg,flac]
Sharon Van Etten: "Holding On" [mp3]

Trampled By Turtles: 2014-07-06, Quincy [mp3,ogg,flac]
Trampled By Turtles: "Where Is My Mind (Pixies cover)" [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Melvins: 2004-09-02, Athens [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

July 18, 2014

Book Notes - Michael J. Seidlinger "The Fun We've Had"

The Fun We've Had

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Michael J Seidlinger's novel The Fun We've Had brilliantly melds joy and poignancy in a work as imaginative as it is engaging and thought provoking.

Amber Sparks wrote of the book:

"Michael J Seidlinger writes with the kind of weird, wonderful, joyful abandon that reminds the reader that world is still the great unknown. In The Fun We've Had, he examines the long blank space between life and death, fills it with love and loss and boats made of coffins, with people clinging to life and using the weight of the past as ballast. This is a fun read, true; but it's also a true read, and that's what makes it so beautifully sad."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Michael J. Seidlinger's Book Notes music playlist for his novel, The Fun We've Had:


The theoretical soundtrack populating the empty spaces of the novel, The Fun We've Had, that's what I'm going to attempt to do here. These are the noises, the sounds, the ambience, the epic crescendos, as well as the depressing and anticlimactic lows that will inevitably occur across the endless purgatorial sea in the book. It both accentuates and masks the voice of the titular sea.

What I'm saying is: Here's a bunch of post-rock. I hope you all like post rock.

Godspeed You Black Emperor – "Storm"

This track alone could be the entirely of the book notes feature given its breadth of scale but yeah I intend on offering more than one of the most popular Godspeed tracks. But at the same time, I can imagine the entirety of the events that took place within the pages of the book completely mapping to this track. I could do without the noise at the end and I'd need more lows, more ambience to the booming post-rock highs that this track most definitely excels at… but then again, I've got other chances to fill in what's missing. Big ups to Godspeed, though. Man, this track.

On to the sections of the book…

DENIAL

This Will Destroy You – "Black Dunes"

It starts out, like any argument, with a denial of what is about to come to pass. This song in particular consistently holds back, opting to establish mood over doing anything in the way of building the typical track via verses, bridges, interludes, and what have you. It helps that the track itself captures the sense of hopelessness and inner pining that starts off the novel. Both him and her, the two main characters, are out at sea and for however many attempts he might have to try to steer them to a definitive direction, they end up where they began.

Russian Circles – "Xavii"

With this one, it feels more hopeful, but it's the same brand of denial—built on the unwillingness of two souls unwilling to work together. I give this one to her, a more hopeful and confident track. Listening to this, it almost feels definitive, like this will all be okay, but it won't. And it never will. It's misleading. She likes to mislead herself into thinking that none of this matters.

ANGER

Frondibus – "Chimeras Were Born"

This track fits in if only because it feels so much like the rise of some new feeling. In this case, it's anger, and it's him, fighting to get back what he feels has been lost against the endless sea that will always and forever be the setting of this book. This song defines an uprising; it defines the first strike in an angered and embittered attack against where both him and her have found themselves.

Man Mountain – "Man of Science, Man of Faith"

But for all the anticipation and aggression, reality sets in and it cuts both characters right down to the coffin: You are here and there's a certain impossibility that has everything to do with what they are unwilling to admit. This song captures that inner quarrel that both characters inevitably face. Plus, it's one of the lesser known post-rock outfits and, man, I love this song.

BARGAINING

Jesu – "Heartache"

But for all that anger and aggression, you end up on your knees, like both characters, facing the absurdity of their setting. Jesu has written some of the most intense instrumental music around and this one, which was actually the fist track I listened to by them, remains one of my favorites. There's something about the way it plods along, taking its time, like some kind of assailant so confident with its kill that it walks slowly, enjoying the moment before the actual kill. Jesu. Yup.

Audrey Fall – "Petrina"

But it can't all be bad. There needs to be some sense of promise, some sense of hope. This track, among so many others—I will state here that it took me a long time to figure out what would follow up Jesu—is perfect as a sort of pick-me-up, hopeful enough to assume that after so much, there can still be more. Keep going, even if there is no end in sight… given that fear is next. There won't be. Somehow, the characters continue, and we keep listening.

FEAR

Moonlit Sailor – "The Golden Years"

Oh man, this was one of those random encounters, a band that I might never have known about. So glad that I've discovered their work and now own their albums. But yeah, here, at the start of the fear section of the novel, I figure it's best to give him and her the benefit of the doubt with a track that sounds more uplifting and promising than the expected dejected shit that a “fear” section would have led on. It's a great track and I am able to map it to a specific scene in this section, though I won't tell because that would only spoil things.

Capricorns – "1946: The Last Renaissance Man"

Don't know anything about this band except for the fact that they have this one album that is amazing. As a whole, it hits all the perfect highs and lows. This track in particular fits with the strung-out situation that both him and her find themselves towards the end of the section. They need a pick-me-up; they need something to feed off of, and it might as well be this track.

ACCEPTANCE

If These Trees Could Talk – "The Aleutian Clouds"

This is where it begins to fade. Acceptance. This is where everything you'd rather forget, the guilt, the summary of your failures, what makes you human, it all echoes out right before you are left with who you are… but hey, this band is incredible. One of the lesser-known post-rock outfits. Most of their tracks are equally as good.

Sleepmakeswaves - "…And So We Destroyed Everything"


This track encapsulates the final section of the book, Acceptance, as well as everything else. It works as well as Godspeed You Black Emperor's "Storm," but maybe a little better because it fits so well as a closer. The way I view the theoretical soundtrack, it's not about giving tracks to certain scenes but rather providing a landscape for those about to dive into the novel. If you agree, then you'll appreciate this track. It's the proverbial life-flashing-before-your-eyes moment, the final exhale, the moment before letting go. Life fading. I hope that you enjoy this track. I'd let go to something as well tempered/written as this. If sleep makes waves, please, let me fall asleep.


Michael J. Seidlinger and The Fun We've Had links:

excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Fanzine review
HTMLGIANT review

Flavorwire profile of the author
Monkeybicycle interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


Posted by david | Permalink | Comments (View)

Book Notes - Christopher J. Yates "Black Chalk"

Black Chalk

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Christopher J. Yates's debut novel Black Chalk is a marvelously complex thriller.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Psychological thrillers don’t get much more complex or twisted than Yates's promising debut."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Christopher J. Yates's Book Notes music playlist for his novel, Black Chalk:


Black Chalk is set at Oxford University, early Nineties, and in the East Village, New York, 2005. The early Oxford sections follow my fictional students as they smoke, drink and listen to a lot of music, so many of my choices reflect this experience (one that I went through myself). Meanwhile, the New York sections follow a damaged hermit who listens to little more than the crazy voices in his head, but I enjoyed working out a few musical tracks that suitably reflect his odd, cracked life.

Theme track: 'We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful' (Morrissey)

Honestly, I could have included twenty or thirty Morrissey/Smiths tracks that describe the sly-but-shy feelings of eighteen-year-old students. I also could have chosen Gloria Gaynor's 'I Will Survive' as the theme track (the tagline for Black Chalk is 'One Game. Six Students. Five Survivors'). But I've decided to go with an early Nineties tune that feels appropriate for the game of psychological dares that my six students play, a game that's riven through with destructive competitiveness and jealousy.

'Everything In Its Right Place' (Radiohead)

The New York sections of Black Chalk are seemingly narrated by a hermit living a life full of strange rituals. His memory has been damaged by his past and his life is guided by a system of 'physical mnemonics'. For example, to help him avoid dehydration, he places six empty water glasses in the middle of his living room floor. When he stumbles across these, his memory is jogged and he drinks some water. Gradually we discover just how many mnemonics he has strewn around his apartment—everything in its right place.

'I Wanna Be Adored' (The Stone Roses)

Early on in Black Chalk, my six students listen to this track as they sit around chewing the fat. Could anything else better sum up the feelings of these awkward but ambitious eighteen-year-olds?

'Eye of the Tiger' (Survivor)

My hermit faces with a challenge. Fourteen years after playing the game of psychological dares he receives a phone call. The game was never concluded. Now, in a few weeks time, the two remaining players must face off. The hermit lives a broken life but knows he has to get mentally stronger and wonders if his recovery could work along the lines of recovering fighters in boxing movies. He evens hums “boxing movie” music, so what could be better than a song written for the Rocky movies?

'Territorial Pissings' (Nirvana)

No novel set in early Nineties student bedrooms would be complete without a little Nirvana. The title is apt, as my students try to stake out their positions within the group. And the line: 'Just because you're paranoid, don't mean they're not after you' couldn't be more appropriate, once the reader finds out there might be something much bigger behind the game being played.

'Can't Stand Me Now' (The Libertines)

A song about two men whose friendship, having been torn apart, descends into loathing. May or may not apply directly, precisely and one hundred percent to my novel.

'Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead' (The Munchkins)

Halfway through my own first term at Oxford, Margaret Thatcher resigned as British Prime Minister. Black Chalk is set in the same period and, after Thatcher leaves Downing Street, my fictional students throw a party and play this song over and over again. I wrote this scene 18 months before Margaret Thatcher died. And after her death, controversially, this song rocketed to the top spot on the UK singles chart.

'Love Will Tear Us Apart' (Joy Division)

OK, this track could apply to maybe half the works of literature in the known universe. In Black Chalk, the love that tears my students apart is a love that is not only romantic/sexual but also based on friendship and their similar upbringings. Unfortunately, it is also the sort of love that led Gore Vidal to say “Every time a friend succeeds, I die a little.” And because 'Love Will Tear Us Apart' was perhaps the most played track in UK student bedrooms of the early Nineties, I'm claiming it.

'Monk's Mood' (Thelonious Monk)

Black Chalk's hermit lives an odd monastic life, describing his time alone before the novel begins as “three cloistral years”. This track by my favorite jazz artist is spiky, from Thelonious Monk's piano-playing style, but also noirish, all smoky horns and dark streets. A perfect track to accompany my whisky-swilling hermit through his strange, unraveling days as he waits to learn his uncertain fate.


Christopher J. Yates and Black Chalk links:

the author's website

Daily Mail review
Publishers Weekly review

Daily Mayo interview with the author
Publishers Weekly review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists


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Atomic Books Comics Preview - July 18, 2014

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics and graphic novels.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. The Mobtown Shank is his blog, and his comic Said What? is syndicated weekly in the Baltimore Sun's B-Paper.

Atomic Books has been named one of Bizarre Magazine's 51 geekiest places on the planet, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Adventure Time #30

Adventure Time #30
by various

This issue of Adventure Time is a standalone. It's constructed like a zine that Marceline is making with the help of her friends, so various Adventure Time characters contribute comics stories (actually done by Liz Prince, Yumi Sakugawa and many more). It's one of the more adorable Adventure Time comics I've read in a while.


Daygloayhole #2

Daygloayhole #2
by Ben Passmore

Daygloayhole is a psychedelic post-apocalyptic adventure comic - sort of like if Paul Pope had created Adventure Time with the help of Mike Allred and Brian Ralph. This issue offers theoretical roaches, tv-faced monsters, a city of traps, a giant, floating-disembodied hand, and references to Ghost Dog, Bolano and Kafka.


God And The Devil At War In The Garden (Monologuist Paper Update IV)

God And The Devil At War In The Garden (Monologuist Paper Update IV)
by Anders Nilsen

Nilsen's God And The Devil At War In The Garden is a tremendous accomplishment. Nilsen is the rare cartoonist who has exceptional thoughts and ideas that are as complex as his illustrations. I could stare at his "Anatomy of a Vacant Lot" for days - and in a way, I kind of have since there is a lot just like it where I live. But the included Conversation Gardening, where he discusses his feelings about Amazon, should be required reading. And oh yeah, Nilsen is also doing this thing where if you buy any of his books from an independent bookseller and send him a note and the receipt, he'll send you back a drawing. Genius!


Henry And Glenn Forever And Ever

Henry And Glenn Forever And Ever
by Tom Neely / various

And here it is - the Henry & Glenn masterwork - collecting the four issue mini-series plus 100 pages of additional comics chronicling the adventures of Henry Rollins and Glenn Danzig. The introduction by Rob Halford is a nice touch. And the color section of covers, cover-variants and other artworks makes this book even more irresistible.


Ritual #3: Vile Decay

Ritual #3: Vile Decay
by Malachi Ward

It's a perspective-twisting tale of how civilization's past decay prefaces its future decay - and a computer program - beautifully told by Ward.


Seconds: A Graphic Novel

Seconds: A Graphic Novel
by Bryan Lee O'Malley

If you've been Jonesing for more O'Malley since Scott Pilgrim, O'Malley has finally delivered the goods in hardcover, full-color glory. Magic mushrooms give Kate, the struggling restaurateur, a do over. But the temptation to not just make her life better but perfect proves too much.


TITLE

TITLE
by Eric Gordon / Sara Gordon / various

The perfect zine for the Robocop fanatic - complete with fan comics, character obituaries, pin-ups and a police blotter - all based around the 1987 classic.


Vinyl Vagabonds #5

Vinyl Vagabonds #5
by Eric Gordon / Sara Gordon

The new issue of the excellent record-collectors' fanzine ups the ante with a screenprinted cover. Loaded with record reviews, a piece on colored vinyl and a review of the records of 2013 - if you prefer your music to come on vinyl, you need Vinyl Vagabonds.


Youth Is Wasted

Youth Is Wasted
by Noah Van Sciver

Noah is consistently proving himself to be the most important cartoonist of his generation. Youth Is Wasted is a rather ironic title for this collection of stories, as it shows Van Sciver, now looking at 30, has done anything but waste his youth.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Said What?


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2013" Book Lists

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)


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Shorties (Indie Songs Inspired by Books, Essential Icelandic Albums, and more)

USA Today listed indie songs inspired by books.


World Cafe listed essential Icelandic albums.


Tor.com interviewed author Tiphanie Yanique.


PopMatters interviewed Nick Sanborn of Sylvan Esso.


Recently wed authors Juliet Escoria and Scott McClanahan are keeping a honeymoon diary at HTMLGIANT.


The Telegraph listed the best internet radio stations.


Bookworm interviewed author Francine Prose.


FACT is counting down the best albums of the 1970s.


Flavorwire recommended fabulist books.


The A.V. Club recommended entry points into Japanese idol pop music.


PopMatters shared an excerpt from Nelson George's book The Hippest Trip in America: Soul Train and the Evolution of Culture & Style.


Jonathan Demme and David Byrne talked to TIME about the Talking Heads film Stop Making Sense, released 30 years ago.


tUnE-yArDs visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Actor and comedian Bill Hader talked books with the New York Times.


Pitchfork is streaming the new PS I Love You album, For Those Who Stay.


Flavorwire shared a nonfiction book for every U.S. State.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


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Daily Downloads (The Rosebuds, Field Report, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Christopher Denny: "Our Kind of Love" [mp3] from If The Roses Don't Kill Us (out August 5th)

Field Report: "Wings" [mp3] from Marigolden (out October 7th)

Hearts of Oak: "Tunnels" [mp3] from New England

Hook and Anchor: "Concerning Spectral Pinching" [mp3] from Hook and Anchor (out July 22nd)

Joe Marson: "Here With Me" [mp3] from Electric Soul Magic

Michaela Anne: Live on WFMU with Irene - July 14, 2014 [mp3]

Ritual Howls: "Zemmoa" [mp3] from Turkish Leather (out September 30th)

The Rosebuds: "Blue Eyes" [mp3] from Sand + Silence

Terese Taylor: "Poor Man" [mp3] from At Your Mercy Circuit


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Paul Collins Beat: 2014-06-27, Athens [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists


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